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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A little over a month ago, I replaced my front wheel bearings/hubs. Considering the cost of OEM bearings and the fact that it was a Friday night, I started shopping around (flame suit on). I thought it would be a great time to review the wheel bearings that are available for our cars. This is not a DIY, but more of a review of the bearings themselves.

OEM - $220 (Edit: $150 - $170 from sponsors)

Of course there is no denying OEM quality. It is certain to fit, certain to work, and certain to provide the same experience that your car did when new. These bearings were quiet and provided very little rolling resistance, although their free-spinning characteristics may have been because of the miles on them, and the absence of grease. I don't have a new OEM bearing to review, but what can you really say? They are OEM and quality. Below is one of my used OEM wheel bearings. Please note the marked groove in the seal, this will be important later.





Timken - $107

I try to support local (Timken is local), but I will be as objective as possible. The Timken bearings appeared high-quality, and are packaged nicely. The bearing and ABS magnet assembly appeared identical to OE, and it came with a nice plastic alignment tool already in the bearing. Installation of the bearing was a breeze. The Timken bearings seem to have slightly more rolling resistance than my used OE bearings. Below is a picture of the Timken bearing, again please note the groove in the seal.





Duralast - $78

They say you get what you pay for, and in this case it rings true. The bearings themselves seemed to be high quality, however the ABS magnet assembly appears to be cut instead of cast, and is quite different than OE. This unit came without an alignment tool. It was difficult to slide the bearing onto the spindle, and the inner race popped out of the bearing in the process. After replacing the inner race and sliding the bearing on, it became obvious that the assembly was rubbing the dust shield. Remember the groove that was in the OE and Timken? It is not present on the Duralast. These bearings are a no-go. Below are pictures of the duralast bearing, and the dust shield that it rubs against.







Conclusion:

OEM is always the best part to put on your car. If you are in a hurry and cannot get OEM at the moment, or if you are thrifty (both were applicable in my case), the Timken bearings can be a viable alternative that will accomplish the same task. I have put about 5000 miles on these Timken bearings so far with no issues. This is in just over a month - I drive a lot. If any issues do arise, I will be sure to update this thread. Hope this helps someone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
My 120k miles minimum BMW bearing beats your 5k miles Timken, no contest.

Today I bought a BMW rear bearing for a 100 bucks. I was almost tempted to buy a cheaper alternative. Then I asked myself: do I want a bearing that's been proven to do 120k miles minimum, or do I want a bearing with no proven track record in performance or fitment ? So I called the dealer parts guy.

One of my OE bearings was shot at just over 40k. Hence me working on them, hence this thread.

I'm not doubting that OE is the best... matter of fact, I think I stated that. However with the short life of the "best" I decided to give another brand a shot. Just over 15k on the Timken so far, no issues yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the review. How did you know you need them and where did you get your Timken for $107?
Timken distributes through several of the chain auto parts dealers (Napa, O'Reilly, Autozone). Check your local chain stores to see who carries them, I found mine at Autozone.


Here is a good video of an E46 with a bad wheel bearing. Thanks to BimmersGarage for the video!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gf3k21QiQxs
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
when people change their bearings they always recommend removing the ABS sensor because they are afraid of damaging it. when i replaced my bearing I dont SEE how removing the bearings could ever damage the sensors. can someone explain?
:dunno: The DIYs that I have seen made no mention of this. I left my ABS sensor where it was at and everything was fine.

You'd have to be pretty careless to damage it IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I replaced my front bearings and still have the same noise.
I spun the rears and they seem ok.Just a growling at low speeds.
I am posting here to add my experience,I ordered timken from fast undercar
at 150 each. They were *** made in Germany parts. Car has just over 100k.
Dealer wanted 275 each.
Are you sure it is not the tires? The OE tires grumble a bit at low speeds, my winter tires do as well. My aftermarket wheels/tires are quiet as a church mouse.
 
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