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"Tie Rod Wear

Symtoms include: steering shimmy"

This isn't always the case. My steering wheel really had a bad shimmy but it was only the bald tires. The same goes for if you experience it when you're braking....its likely just the worn brake pads.
 

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I think you're a bit paranoid. Just drive it, and pay attention. These aren't exotic cars, just "needy" cars. The cooling system needs periodic replacement. Other than that, it's a "normal" car. If you want the best handling, then the suspension needs periodic replacement. Just drive it, and pay attention. The car will tell you what it needs.

Probably the most honest post ever! You guys who bought these cars at 10 or more years of age and think you bought a performance car crack me up. These are family sedans and are not particularly fast. You need to get over yourselves.


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I traded up from a '93 Hyundai, which handles better than a Datsun B210... so performance is relative. And I gt the wagon so I could haul Corvair parts...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTGa...ew-vl&list=PLcAFCEDZU39xYLamb1NBGW_14DrieamN2

Probably the most honest post ever! You guys who bought these cars at 10 or more years of age and think you bought a performance car crack me up. These are family sedans and are not particularly fast. You need to get over yourselves.


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No, it separates the oil from the crankcase vapors. Drains the oil back into the crankcase, and burns the vapors by putting them into the intake manifold.
What do crankcase vapors contain?

When I referred to water/moisture I was referring to that tiny percentage of water vapor in ambient air that condenses into the engine oil, and I thought the CCV was a mechanism for the water to boil off from the oil.
Just trying to get my facts right...
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 · (Edited)
What do crankcase vapors contain?

When I referred to water/moisture I was referring to that tiny percentage of water vapor in ambient air that condenses into the engine oil, and I thought the CCV was a mechanism for the water to boil off from the oil.
Just trying to get my facts right...
The separation method is not boiling, but a cyclonic swirling that uses centrifugal force to fling the heavier oil to the side of the CVV where it then drips down into the dipstick tube on its way to the crankcase.
The crankcase gases from blowby, etc., contain unburnt fuel and gases that get pulled into the manifold to be burnt again. All for the holy pollution cause. So it's more about unburnt vapors than water in the oil.
Old cars used to just dump gases under the engine with a vent pipe.

Good pic to show the input to the CVV entering on an angle to generate the swirling action.
 

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The separation method is not boiling, but a cyclonic swirling that uses centrifugal force to fling the heavier oil to the side of the CVV where it then drips down into the dipstick tube on its way to the crankcase.
The crankcase gases from blowby, etc., contain unburnt fuel and gases that get pulled into the manifold to be burnt again. All for the holy pollution cause. So it's more about unburnt vapors than water in the oil.
Old cars used to just dump gases under the engine with a vent pipe.
I see...good to know. Thanks
 

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Maintenance

Before 60k miles previous owner did oil filter seal, coil packs, water pump. Between 60k and 120k - I did radiator, two alternators, sway bar links (front) , ps hose, radiator hose , oil pan gasket, and at 125k torque converter died ...

I'm sure we can all compare to other cars - if you can diy most of this cost is reasonable , but even my landrover and porsche have needed less work, and my toyota only needed oil changes (sold at 110k). These cars are fun to drive but be prepared to budget $2k a year in maintenance ...
 

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My experience has been slightly less costly. I've been keeping extensive databases on all maintenance costs on an e36 and two e46s over the past twelve years. I'm a reasonably competent DIYer and do all my own cooling, fuel, and brake work, and most simple engine work - but no body work. My average over ten years has been about $1,600 / year. All three cars have had between 60,000 and 194,000 on them. We've also have a Turbo Saab (Aero) and had Volvo wagons and they've been slightly less costly at around $1,400 / year. For the BMW the biggest parts costs have been Tires ($4,300), we run two sets of rims and tires, three season and winter and usually get three driving seasons out of them before replacement. The BMW has also been autocrossed and driven on the track in a DE event. Cooling system is a distant second at $1,600. Labor for all three cars was only $4,000 - some of it for optional body work to repair rust and then a whopping $750 to repair a corroded brake line over the rear suspension.

My car has 171,000 on it and I still have the original alternator and coil packs but the plugs have been done at least four times since new. I did the fuel pump preemptively on my current '00 at 144,375. A word to the wise - ALWAYS replace the fuel pump prior to 150,000 miles.

My experience with daily driven Porsches (944's and a 911) is that they are MORE needy and costly - 944's were around $2,000 / year. Any high-mileage daily driver is expensive to keep in truly good running condition - but the expense levels vary year to year so don't despair. You might have $3,500 one year and $1,500 the next. Suspensions and brakes are often ignored for years and then the owners freak when their favorite indie tells them they need $2,000 in work to be put back in good nick.
 

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Too bad I never drive my E46, but my '84 GMC Suburban has been MUCH less needy over the 7 years 47k I've used it. It had 234k in late '08 when I put it on the road after purchasing it in '07 in San Francisco. It's at 282 now, and the only big expenses have been a full body and paint at +-$5,000 the my ins co paid for, new tires 3 years ago at $800, after a few sets of cheap used tires, (self) rebuilt starters and alternators, pocket change, a new water pump, $50, too bad they're all made in China now. I tryed AC Delco and NAPA, yup, PRC, let's see how long it lasts... Front and rear brakes pads and shoes, under $50 per axle, the radiator had a small leak, I tryed a made in China, premium SPECTRA brand, but it lasted 1.5 years and back it went for a full refund from Rock Auto, and I put the old one back in, drip drip. A made in USA 4 tube one is $600, and she runs hot when I tow, and the tranny died last summer, so $1000 for a premium rebuilt that I put in myself. I havn't added up the numbers, but obviously an old skool GM teeruk ain't no sports sedan...

But I aslo have a 1999 Mercedes E320 wagon with 427k. It has a newer engine at 400, and I installed decent junkyard tires for $80 myslef, balanced and noisy made in China Fuzion's... it had 422 when I bot her in Sacramento last fall for $1500, and was trouble free on the 4k+ ride home, but after sitting a year, I took her to NYC, 300 miles down the road, and halfway there the serpentine belt tensioner-idler fried, on a Sunday, but luckily the FLAP had a new premium quality(?) Dayco-China unit for $130. The AAA tow truck dropped me off in front of Advance Auto, and I was back on the road in 2 hours after borrowing a 12mm socket wrench to work on the EZ access 3.2 V6. It really only needed a $5 bearing, but...
 

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A car is what you make of it. Use cheap junk parts just don't expect long MTBF or reliability on the track or otherwise. I suppose that's the biggest difference. I run Michelin Pilot SS tires and Konis on the BMW. The rest of our fleet uses a mix of Bilstein and Koni shocks; and Michelin, Goodyear, General, Dunlop, and Continental tires. I try to find U.S. sourced jobbers to rebuild parts. We ran a Volvo 745T 'til it had 306,000 on it with ORIGINAL Engine, trans, and turbo; largely due to regular changes of synthetic lulbricants. The car did NOT burn oil when sold. I'm also pretty choosy about what vendors to use and where their parts come from. You can find non-PRC hardware if you know who to talk to and where to look.

It's a shame that the aftermarket is peppered with cheap, and poorly spec'd PRC hardware. It's the Wal-Mart least-expensive is best mentality that drives it. Fortunately my long-hood 911 has become so valuable that there is very little PRC stuff - there's no market for it! Most of the parts I get for it are sourced in Germany or the U.S. - but it's FAR from cheap.

One thing I've noticed of late is that my local BMW dealer is starting to carry what they call "value kits". I'm not sure what the source is but even if it is PRC is still has to meet BMW quality control to go in a BMW box and get delivered to a dealership. I recently did rear brakes and the cost of rotors, pads, and a sensor was within 10% of aftermarket parts. A friend of mine that runs a body shop put me on to this and it's a refreshing change. Some parts still seem exorbitant but it may be because they are two sources for an IDENTICAL part. I just did a fuel pump in my son's 944 and the exact same part number was sourced in the Czech republic and Germany. The one from Germany was $200 more than the Czech one. Is it worth it? Depends on the car.

You take your choices and pays your money.
 

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I'm trying to draw some conclusions?

Never repeat anything for those that may not have seen them before?

You wish you were the one who posted them after all the appreciation expressed?
That was a great list. I have done just about everything on that list and it was a good reminder. Don't pay attention to people who get butt hurt. Welcome to 2022.
 
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