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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
Hello all! I tried to find a thread on this but I struck out. Maybe I wasn't looking in the right place. Anyhow, I replaced the large seal of the quarter window on my 04 330CI. As you can see from the first pic, the molding is in excellent shape, however, the weather seal attached to it is in sad shape. I've been calling around all afternoon for a solution and the only one I'm getting is I have to purchase the entire molding with the seal attached to the tune of $2600! I'm told you cannot purchase the seal without it already attached to the molding. So I was thinking that I'm not the only one who has ever encountered this and I'm wondering if there is in fact an alternate solution. I mean, it's absolutely ridiculous to purchase an entire new molding just to get a new seal. I would welcome any inputs you may have but if it turns out that I indeed have to purchase a new molding, then I'll just end up putting back together as is. Aside from looking like crap, my thinking is water is going to get inside the body panel and will eventually create rust issues but I may be wrong. Look forward to hearing from you!
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Just FYI, the coupe quarter window outer trim does not seal the windows at all. The inner rubber window seal does that. So you do not need a weather tight finish, just make it look good. Some folks cut off the old rubber and fashioned new rubber from general purpose rubber seal. I have seen a few threads on it. Search the DIY forum as well as here (General forum).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Bali! It would then appear that all hope is not lost. I was actually thinking if there were some way to replace the damaged rubber so as to at least make it look decent. I'm glad to know too that the outer trim has nothing to do with sealing the window. I'll look for further threads on this. Thanks again!
 

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It's been ages since I had reason to go looking but there are suppliers out there of such seals with many different profiles. Hence, I would think that you could come across a seal profile that fits the bill and then use a decent rubber adhesive or 3M double sides tape for mouldings.
I'm currently looking to see if if can buy the cheaper black lower coupe seals and attach the chrome/aluminium moulding of the old seal somehow ;) Just cos AU$180-360 per side for the chrome seals is daylight robbery. Not $2500 but still fricking cheeky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's been ages since I had reason to go looking but there are suppliers out there of such seals with many different profiles. Hence, I would think that you could come across a seal profile that fits the bill and then use a decent rubber adhesive or 3M double sides tape for mouldings.
I'm currently looking to see if if can buy the cheaper black lower coupe seals and attach the chrome/aluminium moulding of the old seal somehow ;) Just cos AU$180-360 per side for the chrome seals is daylight robbery. Not $2500 but still fricking cheeky.
Great info Psimitar! Thanks for your reply!
 

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You can cut a strip of bicycle inner tube, longer than the rotting section, and glue it on top of it using suitable (used rubber glue) adhesive. Then use a thin flathead to push the one side of the strip below the chrome (essentially wedge it between old rubber and chrome) so the only visible part will be the 2 short sides of the strip. Glue again on the lower trim.

The bicycle inner tube has surprisingly lasted 8 years and has just begun to show signs of cracking. I'll just peel it away and glue a new piece. The rotting was exactly as yours.

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You can cut a strip of bicycle inner tube, longer than the rotting section, and glue it on top of it using suitable (used rubber glue) adhesive. Then use a thin flathead to push the one side of the strip below the chrome (essentially wedge it between old rubber and chrome) so the only visible part will be the 2 short sides of the strip. Glue again on the lower trim.

The bicycle inner tube has surprisingly lasted 8 years and has just begun to show signs of cracking. I'll just peel it away and glue a new piece. The rotting was exactly as yours.

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Not a bad solution either Paraklas, especially since it has lasted you 8 years. Your input has provided yet another option as to how I might approach this repair. Thanks!
 
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