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Discussion Starter #1
Who check's their own torque wrenches and where do you get them calibrated? Anyone play around with the adjustments?

A poorman's calibration check (lug nut and a digital AC Delco torque adapter) shows my 2-year old Craftman wrench is off by about +2. Not too worried since I can easily compensate for it by clicking down a notch or 2 but I'd like to get my tool to spec.

ft/lb (wrench setting) -- ft/lb (digital adapter, round to nearest)

10 -- 12
15 -- 17
20 -- 24
25 -- 27
30 -- 32
35 -- 38
40 -- 42

I stopped checking after that.
 

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I got friendly with the guys at the Costco Tire Center and had them check my old 1/2" drive torque wrench.

Turned out it was about 12 ft/lbs too light, so I just now add 12 Ft/lbs to the where I want to set it.

Pretty costly even at the online places to calibrate the tools, sometimes it is cheaper to just buy a new torque wrench vs sending it out for calibration.
 

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calibration is expensive. I may try to sneak my wrenches in with my company's annual instrument calibration :)

Best way to do it at home would be to have a fairly accurate weight set and have a bolt in a fixed object, place the torque wrench so it's parallel to the ground and hand the weight off the end. Measure the distance, and calculate the applied torque. You'd have to do some trial and error to see where each weight was triggered on the wrench.
 

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I shoplifted a high-dollar 1/2" Snap-On off my dad once when he wasn't looking, it was an old click-type and I sent it off to Team Torque in North Dakota for a calibration. Cost $75 if I recall correctly. It wasn't off by much, I think a pound off either way. This tool was probably made in the 70s and had never been calibrated, not heavily used and always returned to zero for storage.

If you have a quality wrench and don't care to spend the dough then go for it. Craftsman torque wrenches don't usually fit that description, no offense. But for something that retails for lots o money it might make you feel better, just don't expect to be correcting it by much. It's better to just buy a new cheap torque wrench than to try and calibrate one.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am definitely doing more testing over the weekend and research on how exactly to "adjust" the internal spring mechanism.

Is there any merit buying the high-end (digital) wrenches by Snap-on, MAC, K-D, etc. since those are
only guaranteed for a limited time too (a year or less) and you still have to pay for testing/calibration.

*sign*
 

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Don't get obsessed with it. The one you have will serve your DIY purposes just fine. Unless you plan to rebuild aircraft you don't need an expensive torque wrench. I'm using sh*tty Pittsburgh wrenches for my other drive sizes and I believe they do the job just fine. They might not be dead on accurate but they keep me from overtorquing critical fasteners and that's good enough for the home mechanic.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
:bump:
I figured +2lbs is not a big deal for 99% of the things I'm doing to 'Beulah' and knowing exactly how off the old Craftman is, I can compensate for more mission critical applications. I plan on buying a 1-12 ft/lb micro wrench for little bolts but probably not until I need it.


Don't get obsessed with it. The one you have will serve your DIY purposes just fine. Unless you plan to rebuild aircraft you don't need an expensive torque wrench. I'm using sh*tty Pittsburgh wrenches for my other drive sizes and I believe they do the job just fine. They might not be dead on accurate but they keep me from overtorquing critical fasteners and that's good enough for the home mechanic.
 
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