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Stainless Steel lines

I just finished installing my Goodridge Stainless steel lines (thanks to those that helped me) from the <a href="http://store.e46fanatics.com/upgradegarage.php"><font color='red'> E46Fanatics.com Tirerack Store</font></a>.

This is a great upgrade, especially if you have not flushed your brake fluid in a year or more. The brake fluid that came out of my calipers was brown and burnt.

Before this upgrade I was starting to wonder what happened to the great BMW braking that my car had when it was new, well now I know. Now the pedal is rock hard and the brakes are nice and crisp.


Not the best pictures but I know everyone likes pics :)

<img src="http://www.e46fanatics.com/members/tim330i/sslines1.jpg">

<img src="http://www.e46fanatics.com/members/tim330i/sslines2.jpg">

<img src="http://www.e46fanatics.com/members/tim330i/sslines3.jpg">

Tim
 

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The install should have been very easy but I made a mistake by allowing the master cylinder to run dry when I was swapping the brake lines. Had I filled the cylinder up with new fluid right away then it would have been about 2.5 hours. Because I had to bleed the system 3 times it took much longer :banghead:. Oh well live and learn.

Tim
 

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good to hear Tim! Now work on getting some big brakes. :)
 

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The install was easy enough I take it?

I'm thinking of DIY'ing aswell.

Btw, Nice job and clean those wheel well + slap some EP Oil on the control arm :D
 

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The install was very easy (besides my screw up). If you are mechanical it should be no problem.

I know, I know the wheels are dirty. I really need to clean the whole car at this point. What is EP oil?

Tim
 

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Nice job. Money very well spent. Pisses you off when you make a tiny mistake like drying the master cylinder and spend an extra hour paying for it........

I give this mod a :thumbup:
 

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Great Job Tim! Post a DIY if you can, I am waiting to receive my Goodridge SS brakelines from RennSport. :D
 

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tim330i said:
The install should have been very easy but I made a mistake by allowing the master cylinder to run dry when I was swapping the brake lines. Had I filled the cylinder up with new fluid right away then it would have been about 2.5 hours. Because I had to bleed the system 3 times it took much longer :banghead:. Oh well live and learn.

Tim
Doh! Damn, I bet that sucked. It takes a lot of effort to get the air out of the brake system once you do that. Glad to hear everything worked out goofball. :tongue: :D
 

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vinnymac said:


Doh! Damn, I bet that sucked. It takes a lot of effort to get the air out of the brake system once you do that. Glad to hear everything worked out goofball. :tongue: :D
Yeah yeah, in my excitement and rush to get the lines installed I didn't think about the fluid running out while I was swapping the lines. I was so hung up on using the pressure bleeder and yeah it was stupid.
 

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So it really make a big difference? Because my brakes don't have the same sharpness they used to. I thought it was because my pads were worn. but when I replaced them with Porterfeild R4S pads the petals seem to stay the same.

Truly, how big of difference is it? My dad used to race nascar and when I brought it up to him I was thinking of doing it he said it doesn't help at all. And they may leak from time to time.

I remember when I first brought my car home for the dealership. I just very taped the brake and the car same slamming to a stop. It seems like today I have to press a whole lot harder, almost 1/2 down before I get any real stopping power.
 

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For a quick DIY here we go. Any tips or additions are welcome.

Put the car up on jack stands. You can do the rear first and then the front but it is faster and easier to do all the lines at one time. <a href=http://www.e46fanatics.com/members/tim330i/sslines5.jpg><font color='red'>Picture here</font></a>

Remove the wheels. If you don't have an impact wrench it is a good idea to loosen the lug bolts before you raise the car.

Check that the master cylinder is mostly full. You can leave your existing fluid in there for now.

My lines were covered in dust, dirt and stuff. I blasted the fittings with brake cleaner to keep junk from ending up in the new lines.

Starting at any wheel remove the rubber line. You have to start at the hard line (metal line) side. The hard line fitting is 11mm and the brake line is 13mm. Hold the brake line fitting with the 13mm and loosen the hard line with the 11mm. It helps to put a pan, cardboard or something down to catch the brake fluid that is going to come out of the line. In the front it will drip onto the tie rod end. I used some paper towels to keep the tie rod end clean.

With the brake line off the hard line remove it from any brackets and use a 14mm wrench to remove the line from the caliper.

I again sprayed down the fitting and hard line bracket to clean everything off.

Install the new SS line to the caliper. The good ridge lines were 13mm.

Route the line correctly back to any brackets. This should be done after the line is connected to the caliper as the entire line has to be screwed in (no swivel) and is hard on the line to twist it around.

Connect the new line to the hard line making sure you have the metal bracket bit still in place (it should be unless you took it off to clean it).

Check the master cylinder to make sure it still has fluid in it. If not fill up with your new fluid. Please do not let it run dry, it is a pain.

Move on to the next wheel. Check the MC after each wheel as brake fluid will be lost from the line and as it runs out while changing lines.

Once all the lines are installed if there is used brake fluid in master cylinder remove it. I used a baster because that is what I had and it worked great. If you started adding new fluid skip this.

Refill the master cylinder with new fluid. You want to do this to keep it from running dry, again not fun.

If you have a pressure bleeder you can connect it at this point.

Now we are going to bleed the brakes.

Starting from the passenger side rear (always the wheel farthest from the MC) connect a bit of hose to the bleeder screw. I found that 3/16" ID works great. Put a catch can below the hose. Open the bleeder using a 9mm wrench and watch your old dirty fluid come out.

If you have a pressure bleeder it will do most of the work for you. The Bentley recommends that you also have someone pump the brake pedal 12 times. I did this and found that it was a great help as it moved much more fluid (and air) out of the system. On the 12th pump have them hold the pedal down while you close the bleeder screw.

Remove the 3/16" hose and move on to the driver’s side rear wheel. Repeat.

Passenger front wheel is next. Repeat. Then Drivers side front.

Now you have to go under the car and bleed the clutch slave if you have one. This sucks. Use the same bit of 3/16" line and a 7mm wrench. Bleed out the fluid, push the clutch pedal a few times and bleed again. it mostly sucks because it is hard to get at and I always seem to have a hard time getting access to the bleeder screw.

After that you are done. You should go out and test drive everything first. Then to cycle the ABS find some sand or something and get the abs to kick in. That should cycle all the old fluid out of the ABS system. Then repeat bleeding above (someone needs to come out with a cheap modic style computer thing, like the Audi VAG com).

Things to watch out for:

Don't let the master cylinder run dry. I watch it like a hawk now.

The rear bracket clips to hold the lines to the brackets needed to be bent a little to hold the line tight. That took 2 seconds with a pair of pliers to put a slight bend in the metal thing.

In the front there were no bracket fittings for the line. I cut the rubber fitting off the OE lines and used a zip tie <a href="http://www.e46Fanatics.com/members/tim330i/sslines4.jpg"><font color='red'>See here</font></a>. It is behind the shock body so I think that will keep the heat from melting the zip tie. If it does I will use a bit of wire or something.

If you are doing this without a bleeder then have someone pump the brake pedal while you open the bleeder. If they pump the pedal a few times then you can open it. Have them pump a few more times and then close the bleeder. Check the master cylinder for fluid and repeat until all air bubbles are out.

Sorry I don't have more pictures, when working by yourself most of the time it is hard to get good pics.

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #15
TimeFor said:
So it really make a big difference? Because my brakes don't have the same sharpness they used to. I thought it was because my pads were worn. but when I replaced them with Porterfeild R4S pads the petals seem to stay the same.

Truly, how big of difference is it? My dad used to race nascar and when I brought it up to him I was thinking of doing it he said it doesn't help at all. And they may leak from time to time.

I remember when I first brought my car home for the dealership. I just very taped the brake and the car same slamming to a stop. It seems like today I have to press a whole lot harder, almost 1/2 down before I get any real stopping power.
Like I said it feels like my brakes are new again (I have 40K on the rotors and pads). I have done several autoXs and some heavy street driving. All I can say is that I wish I did it sooner.

Tim
 

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Re: Stainless Steel lines

Tim, did you use super blue fluid?

i did mine about a year ago and the diff is fantastic. I also did slotted rotors and metal master pads, braided lines, and the super blue fluid to compliment the whole setup. Not a mistake at all..

I have autocrossed and done driver schools with no brake fade or problems..

Great addition!

thanks for the post, very nice!:thumbup: :thumbup:
John V
 

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tim very nice job

on the brake lines and the posts afterwards to. now to the next mod. project. lollllllllll
bobm3 :thumbup: :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Re: Re: Stainless Steel lines

johnv325ci said:
Tim, did you use super blue fluid?

i did mine about a year ago and the diff is fantastic. I also did slotted rotors and metal master pads, braided lines, and the super blue fluid to compliment the whole setup. Not a mistake at all..

I have autocrossed and done driver schools with no brake fade or problems..

Great addition!

thanks for the post, very nice!:thumbup: :thumbup:
John V
Yes, I used ATE Super Blue. Next up is new slotted rotors and Hawk pads. Glad you like the post :)

Tim
 
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