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Discussion Starter #1
So, I'm having new winter tires mounted on my snow wheels and the shop was going to mount them on the car. I pulled into the bay and examine the lift which is basically a large rubber covered metal plate that contacts the underside. As it comes up, it hits the bottom of all four black plastic jack guides. I questioned lifting the car with these as I use insert blocks when jacking on them. The shop says they do it all the time and never damage them. The guy hunts around for some rubber blocks to insert at the pinch welds to shim the gap and not lift directly on the hollow factory jack points. The shim blocks don't fit so they try and lift the car with a heavy floor jack that also won't fit.

I took the wheels home and am mounting them myself. Is it standard practice to put the entire cars weight on the factory blocks or am I being stupid?
 

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I do it all the time whether it is on jack stands or using a post-style lift, never had any problems.
 

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What issue do you think using the jack points\pads will cause???? They are called jack points\pads for a reason. You can lift 2 tires off the ground with one jack point\pad - no issues. It would be BEST to use all 4 pads at the same time....

If a pad is damaged - well - they are pretty darn cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well my concern is they are hollow plastic guides for the factory scissor jack to fit into where it contacts solid metal. These prevent the factory jack from popping out. I slip hardwood blocks into them and jack on the wood sticking down not the plastic. ECS makes inserts to slide into these so yeah, they are called jack points but are not recommended to be directly jacked on. I thought they may distort or crack jacking directly on the thin wall plastic. My Wifes MINI cooper has the same blocks and the manual clearly states do not use a floor jack or use jack stands on these. I guess ECS is making things up because they don't know they are "jack points".

http://www.ecstuning.com/BMW-E46-325xi-M54_2.5L/Search/Jack/ES251251/
 

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You are correct in that they are designed to be lifted with the trunk jack only. However, lifting the car how the tire shop does rarely (if ever) causes damage to them. Mine are all intact and the car has been lifted this way several times. The ECS product serves its purpose, but its just another thing to sell people honestly. I am a bit jealous that your latest 'concern' with a 7 year old Xi is with a tire shop lifting your car up.
 

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Mine car has been lifted from the jack blocks on numerous occasions. No issues at all. You're worried about nothing. You wanna hear horror, some guy once lifted my car up with a jack before I realized he was lifting it from the fkn fuel tank. I almost **** and told him to lower it ASAP! Now, THAT is something to get your panties in a twist over. :yikes:
 

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Yes that is standard practice. At the shop where I work we have a couple of lifts like that in addition to the regular 4 posters and 2 posters and alignment racks...

It is fine to lift the car that way, they are there for a reason, espically when all four are contacted at the same time.

In addition approx 70% of the cars out there today don't have jack point or a half arsed frame rail like our bimmers do, all they have is a unibody lip which is like maybe 2mm in thickness, and it is routine to jack these cars up from there. Just food for thought about how sturdy bmws are actually designed to be.

Sent from my SPH-M900 using BimmerApp
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sounds good, I'll have the car lifted from them in the future. Seemed like the cheesy plastic blocks might fail under load - guess not. Oh and Alex, all references to these "jack points" are for trunk jack use. I've read to not place jack stands under them but that may be to prevent slipping, nothing to do with stress.
 

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Sounds good, I'll have the car lifted from them in the future. Seemed like the cheesy plastic blocks might fail under load - guess not. Oh and Alex, all references to these "jack points" are for trunk jack use. I've read to not place jack stands under them but that may be to prevent slipping, nothing to do with stress.
The scissor jack you have in the trunk is not very stable or safe, IMO. Ive had one begin t o slide off while changing a tire once on a slight incline. I had trouble getting the wheel off and the momentum caused it to tilt slightly which could have been very dangerous. Others have said its good to have a mini hydraulic jack kept in the trunk instead as it is safer.
 

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If I owned a shop I would hate to have paranoid customers like you. Just saying..
 

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lol i thought u were talking about shop lifting at a tire shop
 

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If I owned a shop I would hate to have paranoid customers like you. Just saying..
:lmao: I try not to show it, but I have not found a mechanic I can actually trust not to :censor: up simple stuff. So after getting the car back from them, I have to double check their work. I cannot even trust the stealership to do things right either. :tsk: I give a tire shop actual torque specs and preference for air pressure on the tires. They still managed to over torque it :facepalm:


Others have said its good to have a mini hydraulic jack kept in the trunk instead as it is safer.
Which mini hydraulic jack would you recommend? :hmm:
 

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:lmao: I try not to show it, but I have not found a mechanic I can actually trust not to :censor: up simple stuff. So after getting the car back from them, I have to double check their work. I cannot even trust the stealership to do things right either. :tsk: I give a tire shop actual torque specs and preference for air pressure on the tires. They still managed to over torque it :facepalm:




Which mini hydraulic jack would you recommend? :hmm:
You my friend are the kind of person who's car I hate to work on.

1) If you can't trust your mechanic do it yourself since youre so anal retentive

2) If it something that you can't do, I wouldn't suggest going back to the same shop more than once because of the way you obv. treat your mechs and techs.

3) Did it ever occur to you that some people are such pricks to us, that we do things to ensure that they never come back to us?

I.E. I put the requested 32psi in the tires as per my gauge, and people like you come back in complaining that your gauge says 31psi. Hmmm what will you trust? My 50 dollar gauge or your 5 dollar pencil gauge?

Maybe something will happen to ensure that you never come back since you want to be a f*cking prick.

4) We make money per job, and do not get paid to fix our f*ck up. Therefore it is in our best interest to ensure that we do it quickly and correctly the first time so we dont waste time doing it again.

5) You never know who that guy working on your car might be, maybe he's a highschool drop out. Or maybe he's a factory trained tech for Porsche who's local dealership closed and he got laid off. Or maybe he a millionare who is also certified, and has no need to work but does this because it's fun to him (a little extreme, but you get the point)

6) As for the over torque it is a simple enough answer, and is not (generally) any fault of the techs. It is most likely the beaurcracy of the shop. For instance where I work we are REQUIRED to use torque sticks (basically 6" extensions of different grades of sprung steel) the sticks come in three colors: Red, Yellow, and Green

Yellow is what is appropriate for BMW's (e46's anyway) however it goes anywhere from 80 ft-lbs to 100 ft-lbs, so even with a quick zip of the air impact and then hand torqueing to 88 ft-lbs (still required to use torque stick) 9 times out of 10 it will be over torqued by about 10-15lbs. So odds are the techs followed their protocols as they were supposed to, but the problem lies with the beauracracy (making us use impacts and torque sticks).

FYI Torque sticks can be extremely painful when they spring back at you, just a little side note.
 

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P.S. About that jack.

I would reccomend buying your own shop and doing your own work, that way when your untrained arse screws something up you have no one to blame but yourself.

Also please make sure to work on other peoples cars, and when you start your business file as a Sole Propreitership not a LLC, S Corp or anyother related form of business :eeps: :D :rofl:
 
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