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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well. I was going to put this off until the end of summer. But the unlnown is driving me crazy.
If I did not know any better. I would say these bearings was replaced once before. I really doubt it because the head of the oem rod bolts have no wear or torque marks. It was a pain to do this on jack stands and not completely removing the subframe. If I had to do it again using oem torque bolts procedure I would remove it. It can easily be completed with the subframe hanging using ARP bolts torque specs.
I still have to put everything back but glad the new rod shells are in and torqued.

What bothers me is my torque wrench reads out between 74-85nm when I hit 105* angle between all the bolts. I wish BMW would just have a set torque number instead of angle.

I went with ACL standard bearings and oem rod bolts.
The number 5 top bearing was the only bearing showing copper.

Shot out to Paul Vo on this forum. His video and how to post helped out a lot. DIY: Rod Bearing Video

Make sure if you diy. Order extra bolts as Paul suggested. I ordered 2 extra, and did not think I would need it. I could have used 4 additional bolts. The head of the bolt easily gets rounded out when you are angle torquing at a awkward position on the floor.
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E30M3 Race F10 535 R1150Rt M Coupe
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Good job.
While not very practical for the DIY guy, we use digital torque wrenches that can do both setting torque and then by hitting a button do angle torque. The better ones (read: more expensive) will allow for multiple small pulls (working in a confined area) to achieve the final angle number set. However we strive to get the angle in one pull if possible.

Makes an audible sound and vibrates when the target is met. A final torque number is displayed for about 5 seconds when done.
Yes angle torque is a PITA, but much more accurate, other than measuring bolt stretch.
You'll be fine!

Curious, what brand Torx socket did you use?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good job.
While not very practical for the DIY guy, we use digital torque wrenches that can do both setting torque and then by hitting a button do angle torque. The better ones (read: more expensive) will allow for multiple small pulls (working in a confined area) to achieve the final angle number set. However we strive to get the angle in one pull if possible.

Makes an audible sound and vibrates when the target is met. A final torque number is displayed for about 5 seconds when done.
Yes angle torque is a PITA, but much more accurate, other than measuring bolt stretch.
You'll be fine!

Curious, what brand Torx socket did you use?
My torque wrench does all the functions you listed. My thoughts are you need to turn the angle all in one stroke. It would have been easy if I did a few pulls to get the angle.
The torx was a cheap brand I bought off amazon with good reviews. A tool I barely use. It was not so much the tool That caused the bolt damage. It was the position I was in to torque it. If I were to torque it with the motor on a stand it would not be an issue.
 

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E30M3 Race F10 535 R1150Rt M Coupe
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The bearings look as new. They cannot be the original ones from factory.
Likely original, as in "Recall Done."

It's funny on how things differ regionally.
My technician was a foreman at a large BMW dealer in Princeton NJ. Lots of tech folks there. They sold a shit-ton of M3's.
He happened to be at a BMW training with folks in attendance from all around the eastern half of the US.
He was bemused to find a tech from a dealer that have only had 3 bearing jobs.... His dealer was doing some 5 or 6 a week.
 

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Well. I was going to put this off until the end of summer. But the unlnown is driving me crazy.
If I did not know any better. I would say these bearings was replaced once before. I really doubt it because the head of the oem rod bolts have no wear or torque marks. It was a pain to do this on jack stands and not completely removing the subframe. If I had to do it again using oem torque bolts procedure I would remove it. It can easily be completed with the subframe hanging using ARP bolts torque specs.
I still have to put everything back but glad the new rod shells are in and torqued.

What bothers me is my torque wrench reads out between 74-85nm when I hit 105* angle between all the bolts. I wish BMW would just have a set torque number instead of angle.

I went with ACL standard bearings and oem rod bolts.
The number 5 top bearing was the only bearing showing copper.

Shot out to Paul Vo on this forum. His video and how to post helped out a lot. DIY: Rod Bearing Video

Make sure if you diy. Order extra bolts as Paul suggested. I ordered 2 extra, and did not think I would need it. I could have used 4 additional bolts. The head of the bolt easily gets rounded out when you are angle torquing at a awkward position on the floor.
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View attachment 927025 View attachment 927026
ACL. Glad to hear you went with REASONABLY priced ACL. Did you research about going .0001 inch larger? ACL offers that. Can anybody chime in on that? I have always wondered.
I am going to buy the ARP bolts and a stretch gauge. That seems the most accurate way to get a perfectly round tight fit.

I've got another 30,000 miles to go before I hit 150. I'm using Ceretec and frequent Liqui Moly oil changes and keeping the car below 3000 RPM until oil temp comes up to at least 160 F.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ACL. Glad to hear you went with REASONABLY priced ACL. Did you research about going .0001 inch larger? ACL offers that. Can anybody chime in on that? I have always wondered.
I am going to buy the ARP bolts and a stretch gauge. That seems the most accurate way to get a perfectly round tight fit.

I've got another 30,000 miles to go before I hit 150. I'm using Ceretec and frequent Liqui Moly oil changes and keeping the car below 3000 RPM until oil temp comes up to at least 160 F.
I just went with standard ACL bearings. going with more clearance is a toss up 50/50 IMO. No one really knows the real mystery of why the bearings get eaten up. I accept it as maintenance. To find out you probably have to remove them every 10k and measure everything. If my bearings were replaced before I am glad the PO looked after it. Its a 2004 so I doubt it would be under the recall.
 
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