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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have not seen a REVIEW on this tool yet, so here is a brief note on what it is and what it does.

TOOL REVIEW: Laser Tools 4847 Drive Shaft Puller/Extractor Set

Link to Laser Tools manufacturer website (not where I purchased) http://www.lasertools.co.uk/product/4847

A 7 Piece Drive Shaft Puller / Extractor Set. It is designed for pulling drive shafts (AXLES) into hubs

It is advertised as suitable for use on Audi, BMW, Fiat, Ford, Mercedes-Benz, Peugeot, Porsche, Renault, Subaru, Vauxhall/Opel and Volvo

Adaptors include:

M16x1.5 (Subaru)
M20x1.5 (Volkswagen and Porsche Cayenne)
M22x1.5 (BMW E30)
M24x1.5 (BMW E36, Mercedes Benz)
M27x1.5 (BMW E32/E34/E38/E39/X5)
M30x1.5 (BMW E32/E36/E34)

Although the listing does not include E46's, the sizes seem correct to allow use on both the front and rear axles of our cars (rear drive or xi's). I bought it because I spent so much time trying to avoid using hammer/mallet on installing my xi front axles, and plan to do my rear axle bearings later this year.

The too set comes in a blow-molded case. I purchased mine from Toolsmart Ltd (Toolconnect) in the UK for $149 including shipping. There may be other suppliers, but these folks were prompt, sent package insured / tracked, and got me the tool set in about 3 days. The machine work is very clean, and the finish is black oxide w. sliver lettering. There is a BALL BEARING in the receiver / extractor which eliminates concern over binding as the axle is pulled into the hub.

How does it work? The six sizes of adapters are very thin-wall threaded sleeves that screw onto the axle threads with an outer diameter smaller than the splines of the axle. This means that you can screw the adapter onto the axle either through the hub, or before you even start inserting the axle into the hub. Of course you will still clean your splines very carefully first with a wire brush and grease them lightly. Once the adapter is in place and sticking out of the center of the hub, the pulling screw and receiver are threaded into outer end of the adapter. With added grease on the pulling screw you simple hold the receiver cap with one wrench and use a second wrench to turn the screw. The axle end is pulled smoothly into the hub. Because the force is centered, the whole process goes much better - no hammering and worries about wrecking bearings or CV joints.

My experience: I have used this on a SAAB front axle install, and it worked even better than I expected. I have not yet used this on my 2005 BMW 325xi - planning for rear bearing soon.

Recommendation: An individual might or might not find this tool worthwhile - I maintain five vehicles with front or all-wheel drive, and none is brand new. Any shop or independent mechanic should consider this tool or an equivalent (the special BMW versions are MUCH more expensive).

Hope this information will help someone avoid problems and/or save time if you do a lot of axle installs

Mariner05
 

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Thanks for posting your experience with that tool. For those with access to AutoZone, you can borrow their tool, which is what I did when I needed it to replace my Porsche's rear wheel bearings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for reminding about Autozone, Sansho. I see you have a 325i.

I think that you are correct for the rear drive cars' rear axles - unfortunately when I checked with Autozone in my area, they did not sell / rent a tool set that had the correct size adapter for the E46 xi Front axles (different size than rear).

So for non-xi owners, check w. Autozone.

Mariner05
 
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