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I couldn't find too much information about this procedure when I did it. I took some pictures, and came up with a couple of ideas along the way.

Parts needed:
A new diaphragm from https://vanos-bmw.com/disa-bmw-repair-kits (I ordered it on Ebay though).
A DISA Valve in otherwise good shape (or one you are refurbishing).
I highly advise getting a second DISA Valve from the junkyard, Ill explain more.
A O-ring for reinstalling the DISA Valve.


Their is a test you can perform to see if your diaphragm is leaking on your DISA Valve. From G.A.S. (https://www.germanautosolutions.com/diy_tech/disa_repair_kit/m54_disa_kit_diy.php)
Step 3:
Before beginning the installation of the kit you will what to make sure that your DISA vacuum pot is in good working order. This is a very low failure item, but it's always best to check it anyway. The test will confirm that your vacuum pot does not have a vacuum leak. The next step will tell you how to perform the test and what to look for.

If your DISA flapper valve is worn & flops around loosely you will not be able to perform this test since closing the flapper valve will not move the vacuum pot lever. If this is the case with your DISA, I'll show you an alternative way to test it in step #11.


Step 11:
To test the vacuum pot the alternate way, push the vacuum lever all the way in with your finger, cover the hole from step #4, then release the lever while keeping the hole covered. If the vacuum pot is good the lever will spring back about half way then stop. If the vacuum pot is bad, the lever will spring back all the way.



There is a way to test this on car too. Simply use some sort of tool to push the Disa Valve arm into the pot, hold the port shown above shut, and let go of the arm. If the arm moves back under the spring pressure, you have a split diaphragm.

On my car, the Valve itself was functioning fine. But the vacuum pot wasnt holding any vacuum.

Step 1: Disconnect the electrical plug, and remove the DISA Valve. There are many guides out there showing how to do this efficiently.
Step 2: Clean the DISA Valve, clean parts are just nicer to work with, and then you dont need to wear gloves.
Step 3: The Cap of the Vacuum Pot is held down with 6 clips. As well as the 2 clips that are on the extended arm on the cap. The Vano-BMW.com link at the top shows this in pretty good detail. I marked the 6 spots on the cap.



Step 4: Remove the cap on the Vacuum Pot. This is where a second DISA valve comes into play. The easy route would be to simply destroy the cap on your good DISA valve, and use the cap from the junkyard one. I didnt think of this until after I had finished the replacement. If you dont want to grab a second DISA Valve, you would need to cut the 6 retaining clips. This plastic is fairly hard, a fresh razor blade is suggested. It did take awhile to cleanly cut all the tabs.




I did have a bit of a problem removing the Cap still, and cracked the body on the DISA Valve. I simply RTV the hole I had made, its barely noticeable.



Step 5: Remove the actuator access panel. This is required to do on the DISA rebuild that most people do also.



Step 6: Remove the clip and arm. Again this step is required for the Flap repair. Its a good time to do that as well.





Step 7: Remove the Diaphragm and arm. Super easy. The arm can simply be pulled from the diaphragm. Here you can see how my diaphragm was split:





Step 8: Reassemble. Pretty quick, pretty much just the opposite. Attach the diaphragm and arm together, place in vacuum pot. Insert spring, and install cap. Since I had cut all of my retaining tabs, I just smeared a bit of RTV around to help seal the cap, it still fit snugly enough to hold itself down though. Reattach the arm and clip. Reinstall the actuator cover.

Step 9: Install a new O-ring onto the DISA Valve and install back onto the car.


I did this when my car was having running issues (Clogged CAT), and was hunting down any possible vacuum leaks. What I can say is after fixing the vacuum pot, I can feel when the DISA valve opens when accelerating heavily. I do suggest fixing this valve. It was cheap, and restores function to your DISA Valve.

A second sacrificial DISA Valve would have made this procedure quite quick. With a dremel it would be effortless to get the two pieces you need.
 

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Registered
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I couldn't find too much information about this procedure when I did it. I took some pictures, and came up with a couple of ideas along the way.

Parts needed:
A new diaphragm from https://vanos-bmw.com/disa-bmw-repair-kits (I ordered it on Ebay though).
A DISA Valve in otherwise good shape (or one you are refurbishing).
I highly advise getting a second DISA Valve from the junkyard, Ill explain more.
A O-ring for reinstalling the DISA Valve.


Their is a test you can perform to see if your diaphragm is leaking on your DISA Valve. From G.A.S. (https://www.germanautosolutions.com/diy_tech/disa_repair_kit/m54_disa_kit_diy.php)
Step 3:




Step 11:





There is a way to test this on car too. Simply use some sort of tool to push the Disa Valve arm into the pot, hold the port shown above shut, and let go of the arm. If the arm moves back under the spring pressure, you have a split diaphragm.

On my car, the Valve itself was functioning fine. But the vacuum pot wasnt holding any vacuum.

Step 1: Disconnect the electrical plug, and remove the DISA Valve. There are many guides out there showing how to do this efficiently.
Step 2: Clean the DISA Valve, clean parts are just nicer to work with, and then you dont need to wear gloves.
Step 3: The Cap of the Vacuum Pot is held down with 6 clips. As well as the 2 clips that are on the extended arm on the cap. The Vano-BMW.com link at the top shows this in pretty good detail. I marked the 6 spots on the cap.



Step 4: Remove the cap on the Vacuum Pot. This is where a second DISA valve comes into play. The easy route would be to simply destroy the cap on your good DISA valve, and use the cap from the junkyard one. I didnt think of this until after I had finished the replacement. If you dont want to grab a second DISA Valve, you would need to cut the 6 retaining clips. This plastic is fairly hard, a fresh razor blade is suggested. It did take awhile to cleanly cut all the tabs.




I did have a bit of a problem removing the Cap still, and cracked the body on the DISA Valve. I simply RTV the hole I had made, its barely noticeable.



Step 5: Remove the actuator access panel. This is required to do on the DISA rebuild that most people do also.



Step 6: Remove the clip and arm. Again this step is required for the Flap repair. Its a good time to do that as well.





Step 7: Remove the Diaphragm and arm. Super easy. The arm can simply be pulled from the diaphragm. Here you can see how my diaphragm was split:





Step 8: Reassemble. Pretty quick, pretty much just the opposite. Attach the diaphragm and arm together, place in vacuum pot. Insert spring, and install cap. Since I had cut all of my retaining tabs, I just smeared a bit of RTV around to help seal the cap, it still fit snugly enough to hold itself down though. Reattach the arm and clip. Reinstall the actuator cover.

Step 9: Install a new O-ring onto the DISA Valve and install back onto the car.


I did this when my car was having running issues (Clogged CAT), and was hunting down any possible vacuum leaks. What I can say is after fixing the vacuum pot, I can feel when the DISA valve opens when accelerating heavily. I do suggest fixing this valve. It was cheap, and restores function to your DISA Valve.

A second sacrificial DISA Valve would have made this procedure quite quick. With a dremel it would be effortless to get the two pieces you need.
Nice write up! Thanks for taking the time.

Sent from my [device_name] using E46Fanatics mobile app
 
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