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Status report on selector shaft work: I was able to remove the exhaust system today. The nuts on the front were completely gone, so when I dropped the rear section supports it just pulled free from the header flange. The studs are toast, so off to a muffler shop once I finish the trans work.

On to removing the heat shield, disconnecting the driveshaft ends and letting the trans down some more...tomorrow. Bought the External (E12) torx socket today for the rear fasteners.
 

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Some progress. Old selector shaft is out. The new one, 1/2 inch longer needs a little more clearance. I dropped the rear of the trans by removing the driveshaft and it did drop the trans, but not quite enough to clear the frame member so I can get the longer shaft in. I looked in the engine compartment and the front of the engine is now tilted up enough that the radiator fan is hitting the fan shroud hard. It won't go up any more, so I'll pull the fan shroud and see what happens.

** Edit: Pulled the shroud. No effect. I still need the rear of the trans to come down a little more to clear the shaft insertion. Took out the old selector shaft seal for replacement when I get in.

Anybody have a suggestion to get the trans to drop a little more. I'm out of ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter #64 (Edited)
I would remove the fan as well. You should be able to rotate so the engine top rear is resting on the firewall.

If this doesn't work, I would suggest supporting the engine, removing one of the engine mounts and pushing the transmission rear towards the exhaust to give you more room. There is a good amount of flex in the engine mounts, so you might be able to get someone to pull it sideways to make some room without supporting or removing a mount.

Another idea is to lift the exhaust side of the engine (engine mount nut removed) so it rotates the other side down and maybe create enough room.
 

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Thanks: From below the motor mounts look pretty used up, brittle and cracked. Probably should replace anyway, so taking them out not unreasonable. I was somewhat surprised to see that the transmission mounts and flex dis are in great shape.

** Update **

I got the new selector shaft in today. Basically muscled the tail of the transmission down with a "persuader" bar and it finally slid in. I actually "dremeled" off the sound deadening compound and paint from the side of the interfering "frame/floor-pan" to increase the clearance. It's pressed sheetmetal, and through some nearby factory holes in it I can see that its very thin.

Now to clean up the old seal seat and put in a new seal with the shaft. I guess I'll use a dab of trans fluid to lube the insertion.....

Then I can raise up the trans., and put the rear of the drivetrain back together

I have to extract 2 of the 21 trans oil pan bolts that sheared off. They were the two closet to the nearby exhaust, so I guess they got roasted.

Once I get those fixed, I'll reconnect the selector shaft linkage, put the steel dowel back to hold the shaft in and close up the pan with a new gasket.

I just cannot face doing the motor mounts now, and I was not comfortable raising the motor and shifting it around. I've had enough fun for now.

I'll throw a spot of undercoating where I abused the underbody finish...

Eventually the exhaust has to go back on, and that means fixing the rust destroyed exhaust header flange studs. More fun.

Thank you all for your encouragement and ideas.

Final Update: Yesterday I was able to drill out the two rusted broken oil pan bolts that had sheared off and re-tap them at 6mm. Replaced with normal cap screws instead of cheesy torx that suck.

Today, I installed a new filter and re-installed the pan with a new gasket, and pumped in the trans fluid. The $9.95 fluid pump from Harbor Freight takes forever under a car.

Test drove the car today and it actually works.

It sounds like an F1 car with its open exhaust, as I still have to get the header flange studs out so I can reinstall the exhaust system.

All in all this sucked. $150 in parts and fluids, another $100 in needed tools, days on my back under a raised car, covered in oil.

I loved it.

Thanks again to those who contributed.
 

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I returned the new selector switch I didn't need after all. Not long after.. the #2 cylinder lost compression from my lead foot.
I fixed the 325 (which runs as a 5 cylinder) by flying out to Arizona and acquiring an '04 ZHP with a 6-speed manual, from a fellow Z-Mafioso.

Parts
 

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Thanks: From below the motor mounts look pretty used up, brittle and cracked. Probably should replace anyway, so taking them out not unreasonable. I was somewhat surprised to see that the transmission mounts and flex dis are in great shape.

** Update **

I got the new selector shaft in today. Basically muscled the tail of the transmission down with a "persuader" bar and it finally slid in. I actually "dremeled" off the sound deadening compound and paint from the side of the interfering "frame/floor-pan" to increase the clearance. It's pressed sheetmetal, and through some nearby factory holes in it I can see that its very thin.

Now to clean up the old seal seat and put in a new seal with the shaft. I guess I'll use a dab of trans fluid to lube the insertion.....

Then I can raise up the trans., and put the rear of the drivetrain back together

I have to extract 2 of the 21 trans oil pan bolts that sheared off. They were the two closet to the nearby exhaust, so I guess they got roasted.

Once I get those fixed, I'll reconnect the selector shaft linkage, put the steel dowel back to hold the shaft in and close up the pan with a new gasket.

I just cannot face doing the motor mounts now, and I was not comfortable raising the motor and shifting it around. I've had enough fun for now.

I'll throw a spot of undercoating where I abused the underbody finish...

Eventually the exhaust has to go back on, and that means fixing the rust destroyed exhaust header flange studs. More fun.

Thank you all for your encouragement and ideas.

Final Update: Yesterday I was able to drill out the two rusted broken oil pan bolts that had sheared off and re-tap them at 6mm. Replaced with normal cap screws instead of cheesy torx that suck.

Today, I installed a new filter and re-installed the pan with a new gasket, and pumped in the trans fluid. The $9.95 fluid pump from Harbor Freight takes forever under a car.

Test drove the car today and it actually works.

It sounds like an F1 car with its open exhaust, as I still have to get the header flange studs out so I can reinstall the exhaust system.

All in all this sucked. $150 in parts and fluids, another $100 in needed tools, days on my back under a raised car, covered in oil.

I loved it.

Thanks again to those who contributed.
A belated congratulations on your success. You really went through hell getting that job done.
If/when you decide to do your engine mounts, I believe 50s kid has a video, there are also DIYs on this site. It's a 1/2 day job with the Harbor Freight engine support bar. Other than brakes, that job gave me the most satisfaction, as it took all the little vibrations out of the cabin.

https://www.harborfreight.com/1000-lb-capacity-engine-support-bar-96524.html.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N910A using Tapatalk
 
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