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Discussion Starter #1
We at Peake Research have dedicated ourselves to providing quality tools to the BMW community since 1989. It's our belief that the products we manufacture are a BMW owner's best option when it comes to DIY diagnostics.

This article is here to serve as an introduction to our products, commonly referred to as “Peake Tools.”

Peake Tools are hand-held, Non-OBDII, BMW-Specific (this is explained below) code readers. They are affordable, accurate, and extremely easy to use. Peake Tools read the same diagnostic codes that the dealership and technicians rely on. The tools are available in versions for engine and airbag codes, and work on BMWs and Minis only.

We designate the products as “R5 Tools”, as all scan tool model names begin with “R5”:

· R5-FCX3 reads BMW engine codes
· R5-SRS reads BMW airbag codes
· R5-EMX reads Mini engine codes

We have been a trusted manufacturer of BMW-specific scan tools for the do-it yourselfer for more than twenty years.

Why a Peake Tool is a great choice for BMW owners:

Very simply, when your BMW detects a problem, it warns you with a “Check Engine” or “Service Engine Soon” light. You can determine what the problem is by plugging in a scan tool and reading the trouble codes your car is reporting.

For any given problem, your BMW generates two different types of fault codes. One type was programmed by BMW to specifically coordinate with your particular car. The other type is a “generic” version of the code that is vague enough to apply to any vehicle built after 1996. This generic code, called OBDII, is intended to allow state inspection facilities to monitor emissions-related problems present on any type of car they are certifying. The BMW-Specific code is what dealers and technicians use for actual diagnosis.

Scan tools from Peake Research read the BMW-Specific codes, not the generic OBDII codes, giving you the ability to see the same trouble codes the dealer relies on for diagnosis. Generic codes and code readers can yield less accurate and potentially misleading information. Additionally, many BMW Specific codes are simply not represented at all by the generic language. Therefore, basing your diagnostic decisions on the factory programmed codes is the best option for BMW owners.

It is important not to confuse these factory-programmed codes with the ‘manufacturer specific’ OBDII codes that generic tools read. Many generic tools claim to read ‘manufacturer specific’ codes, which are simply an extended range of codes that are beyond the basic set used for inspection. These are completely different than the BMW factory codes as described above.

How a Peake Tool is used:


Peake Tools are extremely easy to operate and require no special training or understanding of auto mechanics. The tool is 100% self-contained in a very small cylinder. There are no external interfaces, computers, or additional software. You simply plug the tool into the appropriate port (one of two possible locations that vary by model year), turn the car’s key to
the ‘on’ position, and begin your scan or reset. There are only two buttons on the tool – one to select the function (labeled ‘Select’), one to operate within that function (labeled ‘Go’). The instructions are so basic that they are printed directly on the tool.

The included instruction manual contains a number of ‘code tables’ that correspond to specific vehicles. When you use the Peake Tool, it begins by reporting to you which table corresponds to your car. It will then give you any current, historical, or ‘pending’ codes the car is storing or reporting. Open the manual, find your table, and then find your codes. You can then erase the codes, thereby resetting the warning light.

Peake Tool FAQ:

Simple Yes or No answers – Do Peake Tools:
Read factory-programmed, BMW Specific codes: Yes
Read the same codes the dealer sees: Yes
Read generic and misleading OBDII codes: No
Reset oil service and inspection reminders: Yes
Include everything you need to read and reset codes: Yes
Include a code manual with definitions: Yes
Come with a 90 day warranty: Yes
Fit in your glove box: Yes
Program or otherwise disrupt your car’s electronics: No
Come from a company with twenty years of trusted service: Yes
Have the honor of being featured in Bentley manuals: Yes
Require a laptop: No
Give the most accurate clues to start repairs with: Yes
Cost about what you'd pay a dealer to run one diagnostic test: Yes
Work better for BMWs than a generic tool: Yes
Work with Non-U.S. spec BMWs: Yes
Work with Diesel BMWs: Yes
Work with Mins: Yes
Just plug in and read codes without any hassles: Yes
 

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Got my Peake tool in this week, reset the oil service and read off an error code, very helpful, very simple to use! :thanks::thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Why don't you incorporate the airbag tool in with the engine tool?
Several reasons, but all focusing on the need to maintain the retail pricing we currently offer. As the vast majority of our customers will only ever need the engine code retrieval functions, packing the ability to read the airbag codes into a more expensive tool won't serve them very well.
 

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I see. I accidently flipped my airbag light on and I'm debating either getting the dealership to reset it when they do my alignment or getting this tool. I'm hoping they will reset my airbag light on the cheap as I know what flipped it.....it was my stupid self when I was working on the seats.
 

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I am hoping someone will respond to my question:

I understand that the first code is the table to use for your car. Mine is 16, a 2001 M3. I have two codes currently, 2C and 0C. 0C is the TPS, but 2C is not in the table. Any ideas? I have had other codes in the past that are not in Table 16. Am I reading the wrong table?:loco:
 

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The 2C in other 6 cyl tables is the oil level/temp sensor which is faulty because it only works sometimes and the oil light stays on far too long after start-up. Sound right?
 
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