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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm buying new springs for my 323i. It sits fairly high stock so I will be lowering it. Any input on how low I should go? And also which springs? I don't want to ruin the ride comfort completely though. A lot of people have said to go with eibach sportline but a 1.8 inch drop all around seems very severe.
 

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Eibach Pro Kit springs will give you exactly what you want. If in a year or so you decide you need more, they're very sellable on this forum.



Good luck,
Rob.
 

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Are you going for stance or better handling?

I would advise, if money's no object, to go for coilovers or a matched spring/shock set (like an H&R Touring CupKit or an Eibach Pro-kit + Koni FSD Shock combo). If you lower your car with springs only, with a severe enough drop, you may end up wearing out the OE shocks quickly, and end up having to replace them anyways. In addition, upgrading the springs and shocks together promotes even better handling. Finally, if you're getting a stiffer ride, invest in some strut tower reinforcement plates; they don't cost much, don't add to the cost of labor, but protect the chassis from deformation.

Let us know how things go along, and good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hmmm thanks for the advice and to be honest a little bit of both handling and stance if possible. And unfortunately money is an issue lol or like you said I would definitely go the coil over route. That being said I'm not going to cut corners on my car and do things cheaply haha.
 

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Do they make the pro kit to fit a 323i? I've only seen sportline for it.

Yes.

The Eibach Pro Kit #2067.140 or in the similar H&R Sport spring #29485

The H&R Sport spring will be slightly firmer feeling than the Eibach.



Good luck,
Rob.
 

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Hmmm thanks for the advice and to be honest a little bit of both handling and stance if possible. And unfortunately money is an issue lol or like you said I would definitely go the coil over route. That being said I'm not going to cut corners on my car and do things cheaply haha.
You might be able to find a good coilover set or cupkit on the used listings on this website. They should be cheaper but still in an agreeable quality.

Good luck!
 
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If you lower your car with springs only, with a severe enough drop, you may end up wearing out the OE shocks quickly, and end up having to replace them anyways.
That's a misconception.

Lowering springs do not wear out OE springs dampers (shocks) at all. Never happens.

What does happen is that you'll see people with 60K miles on their OE dampers who don't want to spend the money for new Konis/Bilsteins and just do springs. Then, when the dampers wear out at 70K miles anyway, just like they would with OE springs, people blame the new springs.

The engineering is simple - there's no reason why a lower or stiffer spring would cause a damper to wear out more quickly (as long as the damper was not bottoming out, but you'd feel that as a huge BANG whenever you hit a bump). A damper doesn't care where within it's operating range it is, and there's no more heat or anything generated by a stiffer spring. In fact, if anything, a stiffer spring makes a damper work less and it should last longer!


I do agree with this:

In addition, upgrading the springs and shocks together promotes even better handling.
Typically because the OE damper is pretty soft and matched to a soft spring. Upgrading all to "sport" components will, as one would expect, have sportier results!

I would advise, if money's no object, to go for coilovers...
For a street driven car, not always a great choice. Why? Unless you're dealing with a proper race shop that does corner balancing, you're not likely to have it set up properly. And unless you're actually tuning it in a track situation, you won't be getting much benefit out of all the adjustability. And, as proven in a few magazine articles over the years, incorrect coilover settings will result in inferior handling compared to a properly-configured fixed damper/spring setup.

But your initial question of "what's your intended use?" is the most important factor above all!
 

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That's a misconception.

Lowering springs do not wear out OE springs dampers (shocks) at all. Never happens.

What does happen is that you'll see people with 60K miles on their OE dampers who don't want to spend the money for new Konis/Bilsteins and just do springs. Then, when the dampers wear out at 70K miles anyway, just like they would with OE springs, people blame the new springs.

The engineering is simple - there's no reason why a lower or stiffer spring would cause a damper to wear out more quickly (as long as the damper was not bottoming out, but you'd feel that as a huge BANG whenever you hit a bump). A damper doesn't care where within it's operating range it is, and there's no more heat or anything generated by a stiffer spring. In fact, if anything, a stiffer spring makes a damper work less and it should last longer!


I do agree with this:



Typically because the OE damper is pretty soft and matched to a soft spring. Upgrading all to "sport" components will, as one would expect, have sportier results!



For a street driven car, not always a great choice. Why? Unless you're dealing with a proper race shop that does corner balancing, you're not likely to have it set up properly. And unless you're actually tuning it in a track situation, you won't be getting much benefit out of all the adjustability. And, as proven in a few magazine articles over the years, incorrect coilover settings will result in inferior handling compared to a properly-configured fixed damper/spring setup.

But your initial question of "what's your intended use?" is the most important factor above all!
Hi Rob,

It is my understanding that a severe enough drop will take an OE damper out of its intended operating range.

And there is a major factor I believe you left out. The valving of shocks is calibrated to work with the tension of a given spring, so that the frequency with which the spring oscillates can be appropriately damped in terms of ride, handling, and reliable operation of the strut. I believe that the valving of OE struts would be over-stressed given the higher frequency of oscillation of an aggressive enough sport spring. Isn't it stress on the valving mechanism that causes struts to "blow out?"

I do agree about the coilovers though. There are more street-oriented vs. track-oriented options, but either way, get it installed and calibrated RIGHT!

Edit: I'm not technically an engineer (quite yet :4ngie:) so please correct me where I'm wrong. I'm on these forums to learn more than anything.
 
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Hi Rob,

It is my understanding that a severe enough drop will take an OE damper out of its intended operating range.
Again, not accurate. Think about how much a soft OE spring squishes... when the car is bouncing around over a rough road, it's easily going lower than a shorter spring. The entire travel, short of bottoming out or hyperextending, is within it's intended operating range. Cut a damper open, you will see the piston chamber wall is continuous throughout the range. No difference.

And there is a major factor I believe you left out. The valving of shocks is calibrated to work with the tension of a given spring, so that the frequency with which the spring oscillates can be appropriately damped in terms of ride, handling, and reliable operation of the strut. I believe that the valving of OE struts would be over-stressed given the higher frequency of oscillation of an aggressive enough sport spring. Isn't it stress on the valving mechanism that causes struts to "blow out?"
More weird ideas I see on the internet through the years. Any talk of "frequency" is beyond reasonably theoretical... you'd have to connect a shock to an industrial high-speed oscillating compressor to damage the internal seal or valve.

As I was trying to make clear earlier, if anything, a stiffer spring will make a strut move more slowly during compression, making the strut's life easier.

Again, the stress should be on the idea that optimized performance can come from matched dampers and springs but changing only springs will NOT damage OE struts/shocks.

I do agree about the coilovers though. There are more street-oriented vs. track-oriented options, but either way, get it installed and calibrated RIGHT!
The amusing thing is that people would rather spend money on generic cheapie coilovers with inferior performance, rather than quality fixed-height spring and damper setups. But considering the "slammed" car drivers rarely have actual handling performance as a priority, perhaps there is a market point for such a product. Not on my cars, though!


Edit: I'm not technically an engineer (quite yet :4ngie:) so please correct me where I'm wrong. I'm on these forums to learn more than anything.
Just be careful about repeating "internet wisdon" - so often these myths get repeated that people believe them, as with the damper question above. Doesn't pass the sniff test when you think about it!
 

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I hope everything Rob from UUC says is right because I have UUC springs on stock dampers. The ride is perfect. The drop is great. I really enjoy these springs. I didn't hear about them until I saw a forum member selling them and he gave me a great price so I had to get them. I really suggest UUC. I would get them again if I had too.
 
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