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Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
Update

A lot of progress has been made! Ive been too busy working on the car, that ive neglected to update you guys! Since you can only upload so many pictures per post, ill post a few times to share everything thats been done.

Day 1:
Sad day as i took my car for the last spin. Pulled it into the garage and got it up on 4 jackstands. Started the removal of pretty much the entire front clip. The first thing i got out of the way were the wheel well plastic covers as they were in the way of everything. After that was out of the way i decided to remove the headlights and the hood latch bar. Disconnected and removed all of the cooling system components and removed. Removed the 4 screws holding the bash bar/bumper assembly, and that entire piece came off (radiator support, bash bar, front bumper). Now after having removed the front end and seen how quick and easy it was, i have no idea why anyone would try to pull the motor without doing it. Makes the job SO much easier. First picture was the end of Day 1:drool:

Day 2:
Drained the engine oil and the coolant. The coolant drain plug on the block is in such a bad spot and i cant seem to find a way to not make a huge mess when draining the cooling system....:loco: Once that was out of the way, my air intake, oil catch can, and intake manifold all came off. Made an interesting discovery at this point, turns out my starter was being held on with ONE bolt that was halfway threaded in:eek: Guess whoever did the clutch didn't believe in torqueing things:rofl: Picture 2 is where i called it a night.

Day 3:
Most productive day by far. Morning started off by removing all the electrical connectors and moving them off to the side. Decided that i didnt want to deal with degassing and gassing the A/C system so i just unbolted the compressor from the block and suspended it with some rope. Next up i got under the car, support the exhaust with a jack and proceeded to remove the exhaust. Next up came the driveshaft dust cover shield. After removing that it gave me access to unbolt the driveshaft from the transmission. I decided not to remove the drive shaft so i just hung it out of the way with some wire. Instead of taking apart the whole shift mechanism, i just popped the shifter arm bushing out and pushed the shifter handle seal out from inside the car. At this point everything was disconnected from the engine so i hooked up the engine with the crane. The whole load leveler deal didn't really work out as i had to crank it all the way to one side just to level out the engine. Once it was connected, i jacked up the engine lift a slight bit just so that there was some tension on the chains. Then i got my jack under the front subframe, popped lose the mounting bolts, and dropped the subframe down about 6 inches (to clear the oil pan). Also last minute remembered to unbolt the ground strap. Next up i popped lose the engine mounts and the transmission brace, and at that point the engine was hanging on the lift. Slowly scooted it back until it cleared the car, then i set it down on some tires and called it a night. Picture 3 was day 3 progress. :thumbsup:

To anyone trying this same deal, let me tell you im so glad i pulled the assembly the way i did. I pulled the engine with headers attached, and transmission all in once piece and it was a piece of cake thanks to the front end being removed. More updates to come very soon :evil:
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Day 4:
Tear down day! First i separated the hear box from the engine and remove the headers. Took about 5 minutes with the engine outside the car. Next step was to mount the motor onto the engine stand, which was somewhat a pain in the ass. After putting it on the stand i realized that you have to remove the flywheel and rear main seal cover before putting the engine on the stand. :( back off the motor came and i removed those things and then put it back on the stand. Now one thing i forgot to mention earlier, this build is on a strict bag and tag basis. EVERY single nut, bolt, and part is placed in a ziploc and labeled. For the more confusing parts (where different things look similar) i referenced parts diagrams and recorded the part number on the bag to ensure it found its place again. I also set up sort of a grid where i laid out every part i removed, in order of removal. Once valve cover was off it gave me access to remove the VANOS. At this point it was about 1:30 AM in the morning, and i ran into two problems. First of all the two allen key VANOS plugs were both stripped. This problem was solved by taking a triple square socket, and beating it into the plug, it gets stuck and that allowed me to remove the plugs. After removing those plugs i couldnt figure out why the VANOS to Cam screws were on so tight!!! After breaking both off, i discovered they were right hand thread..... Then i had to drill both studs out, which luckily were not in very tightly. Learned a lesson here, engine work while partially conscious is not a good idea :rofl: once vanos was out, i discovered that one of the VANOS studs is stripped out of the block. Next up was removing the cams, for which there is a specific process. Used a great guide which i will link at the end. Before removing the cam trays i labeled all the lifts and made sure to remove them in order. Now i had access to the headbolts, which there is also a specific removal process to follow. Now when removing the bolts in one of the corners of the block i knew instantly that i pulled threads. :( Removed all of the headbolts using my magnetic extension and threw them straight in the bin (they cannot be reused). Head lifted off very easily. Once the head was off, the Previous Owners lies had been exposed. When i bought the car i was told the car had never overheated and still had the OEM head gasket. Turns out all that was a lie, the head and blocked had already been (poorly) decked, already had an oversized head gasket, and the block was also (improperly) time serted. Great, more crap to deal with. Getting back to the stripped threads, one of the time serts had pulled the blocks threads. At this point i thought the block was shot, but my machinist recommended i call time sert and ask if they could help me. Turns out they have a product line called "BigSerts" that are essentially oversized time serts. I had two options at this point: buy the diy kit with the conplete tool kit for $500 or buy the $90 kit with 5 inserts and the tools to install them, and have my machine shop do the labor for $40. Obviously went with the second option. Now that that problem was resolved i could focus on the bottom end of the block. Once i flipped the block over on the stand a lovely combo of oil and coolant was shat out onto the ground. Learned another lesson, put a drop cloth under the stand. Bottom end then came out (oil pump, crank) and finally timing cover. This left me with a empty block. I didnt really have help, so i held the block with 1 hand while undoing the stand bolts to get it off. At this point it was 2 AM, so i loaded the block and head into my car so that they could be taken to the machine shop. Last picture you can see all the parts covering my garage floor. More to come!
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Im actually going to be using the 2.5 pistons with the 3.0 rods and crank. That plus the 1mm head gasket should get my compression ratio close to 9.3-9.4:1 according to hobbit.

On other note, heres a side by side of the 2.5 rods (left) and the 3.0 rods (right). You can see the 2.5 rods are cast as one piece and then fractured. The 3.0 rods are cast as two separate pieces. Apparently the cracked design is preferred over the two piece design, but looking at the two side by side, the 3.0 rod definitely looks a lot more beefy. Im replacing the piston ring bushings and the con rod bearings + the ARP rod bolts. Hopefully these bad boys hold some boost and dont decide to let go! :thumbsup: Auto part Connecting rod Transmission part Automotive engine part Metal
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
A stroker rebuild is something I am planning for my 2.8 at the moment, only I want to be all engine. Will be a while before I get to do it, but OEM parts and plans don't really change. Subed for sure!
The cost of parts is definitely discouraging. I spread out all my parts over about 2-3 months. After the machine shop work my wallet is lookin pretty empty right now :eek:

I admire an all motor setup. Just seems like it would cost a lot. Im guessing more power would come from porting the head, bigger valves, cams, and higher RPMs? Good luck with your build and make sure to start a build thread when you do get it going :thumbsup:
 

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I was thinking mellow, reliable power. 3.0 bottom, mild port, cams, and refresh everything. Stick with bmw parts, and do all the work not requiring large equipment.

Looking foreword to your build, as I will defiantly use the information.

Look below for my build thread ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 · (Edited)
So as promised, more updates! :)

Here is the "BigSert" kit that i received from TimeSert. It was taken to my machine shop and the labor only set me back $40. Total cost to repair the stripped TimeSert: ~$160


Here you can see what a standard TimeSert looks like:


Versus the BigSert (not quite sure what the half circle cutout is, but it was there before the machine shop did the new insert):


As a bonus heres a few pictures of the head. Had it fully rebuilt (acid dipped, coated, stem seals, springs checked, seats recut, and surfaced):



And then finally after I honed the block. I used a flex hone (89mm diameter, 240 grit) to hone the block and lubed it with some standard 10w-30 oil. The crosshatching is more visible in person, the flash makes it really hard to see.



Not quite sure im happy with the way the honing turned out. Theres some random lines at the top (i think i accidentally inserted the hone before the drill had spun up). Does anyone have any tips on flex honing? My machinist said: lube with oil, 30 strokes with drill going clockwise, then without removing the bit flip over to counter clockwise and do 30 more strokes, and finally pull the hone out while its still spinning.

Also received the rod wrist pin bushings after BMW had to special order them. I noticed that the old bushings have an oil hole in them, but the new replacement bushings (P#: 11241278209) do not have any oil holes. Do the oil holes have to be drilled or are they not necessary?

 

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http://www.timesert.com/html/BMW-1090-platekit.pdf

If you look under the word 'Instructions', you will see 'This tooling will install inserts at 6mm depth'. Is it possible that the timesert that you had to replace pulled due to incorrect installation? As yours are installed flush to the block, the first 6mm from the deck down could well possibly be only a partially cut thread. That leaves you with 19mm of thread engagement on the sert. The recess in a factory block is 12mm diameter x 6mm deep, on all but the dowelled studs. The tap is M12 x 1.5. If you have the 24.5 long serts installed, you may wish to consider replacing all with bigserts.
 

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Nice progress so far. Hmmm Davew has a very good point.
If he is lucky, previous owner has instlled 30mm serts. If they are 24mm, this is an issue.

There is no oil passage through the connecting rod, the bearing will need to be drilled after installation as you are relying on oil from the squirters to find its way in there. No hole, no oil.

Predrilling the hole would make correct alignment very difficult during installation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
If he is lucky, previous owner has instlled 30mm serts. If they are 24mm, this is an issue.

There is no oil passage through the connecting rod, the bearing will need to be drilled after installation as you are relying on oil from the squirters to find its way in there. No hole, no oil.

Predrilling the hole would make correct alignment very difficult during installation.
Thanks for bringing this to my attention. It looks like PO cheaped out and decided to use the $90 timesert kit, instead of the $500 BMW specific kit that has all the proper install tools. Luckily the inserts are 30mm, so at least he cheaped on the right way. Anyways got the new bushings (2 of them) pressed and drilled for $10 at the local machine shop, but they dont fit the wrist pins. Going to have to take them back to be honed to each specific wrist pin.

On another note, does anyone know if the getrag 5 speed to zf 5 speed is a direct swap? Did some initial measurements and ive found that the ZF box is slightly longer. Hopefully i get some info on this before installing it and having it not fit.
 

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No worries, I thought it would be better to check before the head goes on :thumbsup:

Weird that one of the timeserts had failed, it would have been an easy explanation of why it had happened if the wrong ones were installed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Updates!
So today i picked up the connecting rods from the machine shop. $20 later both wrist pin bushings had been honed to fit the wrist pins for the corresponding piston. Also got the crankshaft installed today and plastigauged (measured 0.025mm)!

Now this is where im stuck. I put the rings on all the pistons and installed one of the piston/rod assemblies into the block. Torqued it to 36 ft/lbs (ARP spec). After that i removed it to check the clearance on the plastigauge. It measures at 0.051mm and the range for the con rods is 0.020-0.055. Now this makes me a little nervous so i wanted to check and see if anyone had advice. Is this safe to run so close to the limit of spec? Would it be better to purchase oversized bearings to bring it back into spec?
 

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This thread is getting me excited, and I'm really curious how that cx kit is gonna fit. The internet says the top mount interferes with the A/C condenser, and that's kind of a bummer, but there has to be a way to make it work with some modding.

This could be a suppper affordable turbo kit and if everyone uses the same kit with the same hardware it means we can have a common tune that everyone can build off of(if we don't already). Hopefully this summer I'll have the funds/balls to try this.

Good luck with your build!
 

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Ill definitely have to come check out this once Im free. I had intended to come down but finals is next week. Hopefully I can come see
 
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