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can someone please explain to me how to use a buffer. I love cleaning my car and i would want to take my time at it but I also dont want any risks with a buffer so what buffer would be good to use for a first timer and can someone please provide simple but descriptive directions on how to use that specific buffer.:)
 

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V, i herd that porter cable is great and can make a novus a great buffer. i dont have to much info on this so maybe someone can elaborate.
 

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I'll try to help out by writing but my best suggestion is to learn in person. If you lived near Connecticut I would say to bring a 12 pack and I'll teach you. If anyone else is interested reply to this thread and if there are enough people I'll start a thread and set a date.

Buy yourself a good industrial grade high speed orbital buffer with variable speeds. Makita makes a good one and Porter Cable is good as well. Also you need to use ONLY foam pads. 3M makes the best so that's my reccomendation. Tan pads are for compound, grey pads are for polishing. They come in packs of two and you can pick them up at any auto body supply shop. DO NOT use wool pads if you intend to compound, they cut too way fast for a novice and you will most likely do more harm than good.

First and most important: Use a decent masking tape to mask off ALL the edges on the surface you intend to use the buffer on. This will prevent you from burning through the edges where the paint is thinnest.

Apply a decent amount of whatever material you are working with to the surface. Remember that you will work in small sections. IE: a hood should be done in at least 4 sections. Set the buffer at 1500 RPM and make sure the ENTIRE pad is in contact with the surface. Use a slow back and fourth motion and overlap your last pass each time. If you are using a compound, you will know when you are done because most small surface scratches will disappear. Work the material until it is gone and a satisfactory gloss is achieved. Don't expect a wet look from compound as it MUST be followed with polish and hand glaze.

This is a pretty broad overview but should be enough to get most people started. Don't take any guesses at anything, if there is a doubt about something make a post and I'll try to help out.

Part #'s for products:
3M Polishing Pads 051131-05725
3M Compound Pads 051131-05723
3M Compound 051131-05973
3M Hand Glaze 051131-39007
3M Finesse It ?????
 
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