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2005, BMW, 330CIConvertible, 2009 e93 335i
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Everyone, I'm new here. I just got an e46 to join my e93 and am in the process of restoring her to showroom mechanical and cosmetic condition. I was doing all coolant system replacement procedure then the hard plastic hose on the driver side broke off and left the nipple inside the engine block. It's the part with the two o rings... no idea how to remove this without risking permanent damage to engine block hose receptacle mating surface.

I know I am not the first to experience this situation. What was your solution? Thanks for your input and advice.

VT
 

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Pull it out with whatever...maybe try to wiggle it a bit to break the 'seal' of crust.

Then, clean the bore out best you can with whatever...a wire 'test tube' brush on a drill might work for one...the other is hard to do that way (as I recall).

Also, add rtv onto the o-rings when reassembling and let it set before adding coolant.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That sounds unwise. Two reasons:

The stuck portion is totally flush with no chance of grabbing any piece to pull out.

1. boring out the plastic inside creates tons of debris that will enter the coolant system. There will no way to completely clean it after all that shredded plastic is inside.
2. Boring out the plastic inside gives chance to damage the inner mating surface that will create leaks with the new pipe and gaskets.
3. Wire brush drill is a nonstarter.

I always add lube to o rings when I replace fittings to prevent this. In this case, this car was from a stranger who did not do proper maintenance.
Thanks for the suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have tried using cir-clip expanding pliers to grip the inside of the hose and wiggle it out... no luck. That hard coolant nipple had two o-rings which make it very difficult to pull out.

15 mm internal diameter (19/32 inches - 059375 inches).

There are no internal pipe head removers that are this size. All I have seen are in SAE and non have the 19/32 size.
 

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Use a cheap soldering iron to slowly melt through the plastic remnants to "cut through" at one or two spots. Once you break through you should be able to start gently lifting up the remainder of the remnants and pull them out. Set up a fan so you aren't breathing in the smoke.

To clean out the residue that will remain in the bore, I used a 1 inch, 320 grit aluminum oxide flex hone (dingleberry) on a drill along with some of the flex hone oil to prevent galling and to manage dust/debris. Others seem to use a small wire wheel on a dremel or such, but I think you want to keep speed slow and move it in and out so you are not wearing out one spot too much.

I put some shop towels in the cavity behind the bores to mop up the slurry that forms while cleaning , and changed them frequently. Once bores are done then clean up with brake cleaner and more shop towels until you are no longer picking up any anything (a dark grey paste) from inside the head just past the bore ... when the break cleaner soaked towels come out clean you can move on.

It takes some persistence, a lot of shop towels, it's a pain, (and not sure it's the best way) but have done two e46s this way with success and no leaks. I also did not need to use rtv to get a good seal, but I did grease the o-rings on the new coolant pipes with a light coat of silicone paste to keep them from rolling over and out of their grooves during install. The new pipes go in with some resistance, which gives hope for a good seal. I have 20k miles on one engine and just did the other one with no leaks so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Use a cheap soldering iron to slowly melt through the plastic remnants to "cut through" at one or two spots. Once you break through you should be able to start gently lifting up the remainder of the remnants and pull them out. Set up a fan so you aren't breathing in the smoke.

To clean out the residue that will remain in the bore, I used a 1 inch, 320 grit aluminum oxide flex hone (dingleberry) on a drill along with some of the flex hone oil to prevent galling and to manage dust/debris. Others seem to use a small wire wheel on a dremel or such, but I think you want to keep speed slow and move it in and out so you are not wearing out one spot too much.

I put some shop towels in the cavity behind the bores to mop up the slurry that forms while cleaning , and changed them frequently. Once bores are done then clean up with brake cleaner and more shop towels until you are no longer picking up any anything (a dark grey paste) from inside the head just past the bore ... when the break cleaner soaked towels come out clean you can move on.

It takes some persistence, a lot of shop towels, it's a pain, (and not sure it's the best way) but have done two e46s this way with success and no leaks. I also did not need to use rtv to get a good seal, but I did grease the o-rings on the new coolant pipes with a light coat of silicone paste to keep them from rolling over and out of their grooves during install. The new pipes go in with some resistance, which gives hope for a good seal. I have 20k miles on one engine and just did the other one with no leaks so far.
Soldering tool sounds like a good idea... I had no idea that a soldering heat gun could even melt the hard coolant pipe plastic. I will give this a try.

Thanks for your suggestion and advice.
VT
 

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Soldering tool sounds like a good idea... I had no idea that a soldering heat gun could even melt the hard coolant pipe plastic. I will give this a try.

Thanks for your suggestion and advice.
VT
It's a smokey mess, but my cheap three dollar 30 watt soldering iron did the job. The tip trashed of course ...
 

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Good work. I used a few different picks to break up the plastic and pull it out. Wasn't particularly fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It's a smokey mess, but my cheap three dollar 30 watt soldering iron did the job. The tip trashed of course ...
Dude... TOTALLY WORKED. I slowly cut three places and it basically crumbled enough to pull out with fingers.
Then, to be totally sure, I took out the waterpump to check if any of the plastic crumbs fell down into the pump chamber...sure enough, took out three pieces and also reached into the channel beside the pump chamber and pulled out the rest. Pretty sure no crumbs went any deeper into the block since from that point on, it is horizontal and then only goes upward.

I video documented the process and will credit you in the video when my BMW CHANNEL on youtube officially opens. Right now I am making all the content from begining to end so that I can take my time to turn out one job per week on the car until the car is showroom or better restored. The concept of this series is "how much work and money it takes to get a used e46 330ci convertible in decent shape to literally factory/showroom or better condition mechanically and cosmetically.

I have most typical diy planned: valve cover, waterpump/thermostat/oil pan gasket/ OFH Gasket, starter, manual gear oil, differential oil, engine mounts, rear subframe bushings and differential bushings, trailing arm bushings, subframe reinforcement procedure, interior/exterior trim and paint restoration etc... It should be a pretty long series.

Thanks a million for your help. This is my first e46. I am an e92 n54 n55 guru, but not M54 yet.
With your help and this forum, I hope to catch up with you guys soon enough!

VT
 

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Hey no problem. I do have to say that somebody else here mentioned the soldering iron trick, so I can't take all the credit for that. There are a bunch of threads with good pictures for cleaning up the coolant pipe remnants. Also, make sure to take out the thermostat also because that gives you a straight view of the space behind the coolant pipe bore that faces toward the cylinders. A shop vac can help as well, since you dont want to leave any hard pieces behind. Its a nerve wracking job for sure!
 

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You might consider testing the coolant pipes seal before reinstalling the intake. It is quite easy to roll an o-ring, and you might not see it.

I use a hollowed-out thermostat housing (thermostat removed)...I hook up all plumbing pipe/hoses/WP and add distilled water. Then I pressurize the cooling system to about 15 psi using a compressor and an air chuck connected to my bleeder screw...then I look for leaks where the coolant pipes enter the block - both of them...This has saved me a couple of times.
 
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