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Hey Everyone,

Two weeks ago I bought a 2003 330xi and I have already replaced the spark plugs, and fixed rust and now I am working on the Ebrake (just waiting to find a kit for cheap)

Anyway my car is leaking oil because one of the holes for the oil pan going into the block is stripped.

Is it going to be hard to remove everything to get to the block, like the dif and everything on a AWD? What do you all recommend to do for the actual fix? Retap or something else considering it is going into the block?

If anyone could link me to somewhere with a video or instructions on getting to the oil pan on a xi, I would appreciate it!

Thanks so much!
 

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2003 325xi 5spd Manual
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You will have to pull the axles and subframe to do an oil pan on an XI, plus supporting the engine, not fun business, not worth it. Maybe retap the thread and hope.
 

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It's a nightmare on AWD. It already is a days labor for RWD.

Dont waste your time. Retap it.

Sent from my SM-N960U1 using Tapatalk
 

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I don't think any of the holes go through, do they?

I'm going to predict your oil leak is (hopefully) the housing gasket (search OFHG)

front main seal, valve cover, VANOS pipe, oil pan gasket, or rear main, roughly in that order.

I have a theory that the xi is more likely to have a pan leak because the pan's got a lot of forces
working on it, and the gasket design is, frankly, crap.

Changing it is, in fact, a real pain in the neck, and eyes, from all th junk you get in them,
but it's not particularly hard:
support the engine from above, and lower the subframe about as far as the axles let you.
Clean for 3 hours, reassemble.
While you're at it, change the diff seals, the diff seal o- rings, any questionable suspension parts, the front main,
probably all the power steering hoses... well, you see how these things go...

t
 

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If it were in my driveway.......

I'd clean the threads with compressed air. Grab a SAE tap of 1/4"x20 thread and send it in. Blow the hole clean again and very gingerly tighten the new 1/4x20 bolt of the correct length and call it a day.

At the end of the day if that didn't work, then you can go cowboy, drop the pan and use the proper Time-Sert or helicoil to repair the thread hole on the aluminum engine block.
The thread repair kit ends up being 8mm in OD, so the first step of an attempted repair by using the 1/4" x 20 is of no consequence.

1/4" is just about 6.3 mm. just slightly larger than what was in there. Usually enough, if you're careful.
 

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never buy an xi

sell it

awd on a car is a crock, good snows is all you need
 

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never buy an xi

sell it

awd on a car is a crock, good snows is all you need
That's the policy I follow, but I know many enjoy having AWD. I know myself too well that I won't want to work on the extra requirements of having an XI. Best of luck to OP, there was some good advice given in the thread.
 

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That's the policy I follow, but I know many enjoy having AWD. I know myself too well that I won't want to work on the extra requirements of having an XI. Best of luck to OP, there was some good advice given in the thread.
Mantraxale, don't put down AWD unless you try it. My xi is my first AWD and with winter tires I feel safer driving in the snow. Sure, some repairs are harder, but I am happy to pay the premium in both parts and my labor to have AWD.

We used a timesert to repair the oil drain in a friend's xi. We were very careful and took our time. We greased the tool to catch metal shavings and removed the burrs every half turn At the end we ran some oil with the drain open to flush out any remnants. The only hard part is drilling the new hole, but let the bit guide you, it will follow the existing hole. We were able to torque the plug to the correct value and it has been bone dry ever since.

Here is what we used. Not cheap, but you can make your money back if you fix one more oil pan! Definitely beats buying and installing a new pan. Highly recommended.

Chris.
 

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Mantraxale, don't put down AWD unless you try it. My xi is my first AWD and with winter tires I feel safer driving in the snow. Sure, some repairs are harder, but I am happy to pay the premium in both parts and my labor to have AWD.

We used a timesert to repair the oil drain in a friend's xi. We were very careful and took our time. We greased the tool to catch metal shavings and removed the burrs every half turn At the end we ran some oil with the drain open to flush out any remnants. The only hard part is drilling the new hole, but let the bit guide you, it will follow the existing hole. We were able to torque the plug to the correct value and it has been bone dry ever since.

Here is what we used. Not cheap, but you can make your money back if you fix one more oil pan! Definitely beats buying and installing a new pan. Highly recommended.

Chris.


I think the OP is having an issue with one or more of the bolts that hold the oil pan to the block, not the hole for the drain plug.

They make an insert that fits into the drain plug hole and cuts its own threads, then you use the drain plug that comes with it. Your method works fine, but there is an easier way.

NOTE TO THE OP
Be very careful in the work you are doing on the engine block, it's aluminum and you don't get very many chances to recover from the previous mistakes.
 

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I think the OP is having an issue with one or more of the bolts that hold the oil pan to the block, not the hole for the drain plug.

They make an insert that fits into the drain plug hole and cuts its own threads, then you use the drain plug that comes with it. Your method works fine, but there is an easier way.

NOTE TO THE OP
Be very careful in the work you are doing on the engine block, it's aluminum and you don't get very many chances to recover from the previous mistakes.
I think you are correct, thanks for pointing it out. It is not unheard of for a thread to follow a different path than the OP intended. Nevertheless, I found the information already posted very valuable.

If you have experience with the method or tools you describe please post. I tend to place a lot more value in tools and procedures that people have actually tried. I would certainly not discourage you from pointing to things you have not tried, but if you did please say so!

Chris.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Mantraxale, don't put down AWD unless you try it. My xi is my first AWD and with winter tires I feel safer driving in the snow. Sure, some repairs are harder, but I am happy to pay the premium in both parts and my labor to have AWD.

We used a timesert to repair the oil drain in a friend's xi. We were very careful and took our time. We greased the tool to catch metal shavings and removed the burrs every half turn At the end we ran some oil with the drain open to flush out any remnants. The only hard part is drilling the new hole, but let the bit guide you, it will follow the existing hole. We were able to torque the plug to the correct value and it has been bone dry ever since.

Here is what we used. Not cheap, but you can make your money back if you fix one more oil pan! Definitely beats buying and installing a new pan. Highly recommended.

Chris.

Hey Chris,

One of the holes that holds the pan to the block is stripped, not the oil pan. Thank you for the advice though, I am sure it is the same process for going into the block..., ill update on how it goes. Thanks!
 

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Hey everyone!

Thank you for all the advice, I will be dropping the entire subframe and most likely helicoiling the hole. I will update you all on how it goes! Thank you so much for all the help, I really do appreciate it!

-Marcus
 

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I think the OP is having an issue with one or more of the bolts that hold the oil pan to the block, not the hole for the drain plug.

They make an insert that fits into the drain plug hole and cuts its own threads, then you use the drain plug that comes with it. Your method works fine, but there is an easier way.

NOTE TO THE OP
Be very careful in the work you are doing on the engine block, it's aluminum and you don't get very many chances to recover from the previous mistakes.
Yes I will be very careful and try to get help from some friends who work at shops. Thanks!
 
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