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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
www.bmwteka.com has what you need.
Thank you, lots of wiring diagrams on this

Here is one the the reference sites I use for DME connections. It's generally correct. That is, there are a few minor discrepancies depending on your engine build date. StandAlone engine swap guide.
That’s been helpful as well I like the layout of this Pinout.
I decided to start looking for different problems because I’ve checked everything around o2 sensors. Now I’m looking at the crank position sensor, wiring from plug to dme plug is good, but I’m not getting any resistance when I try to test the crank sensor. Not sure if that’s normal for these cars but I thought I should be getting resistance from it. Also, my grandpa with a good amount of car experience said he’s heard of problems like this from a bad alternator. Did some research on this and I see where he’s coming from. All these electrical issues could potentially be from an alternator failing. He also mentioned I could have jumped a chain on my timing belt, along with faulty ground. So now I ask you guys what should I look for first and how. My battery reads 12.13 volts and there’s no corrosion on any cables I’ve seen, but when unplugging the crank sensor, it was drenched in oil. Really missing this car right now it’s been over a month since these problems started :/
 

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2000 E46 323i, 3.0L and 2.0L Z3's
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So, there is lots of oil in the crank sensor electrical connection. There are getting more reports of sensors on the E46's cracking internally and letting coolant or oil through to the electrical connector. The coolant or oil track up to the DME and cause problems. Coolant corrodes the DME pins, usually resulting in a replacement DME. Oil shorts things out and causes fuel trim control problems.

  • Check you DME connectors for contamination, especially X60003, its the biggest one.
  • The oil in the Crank sensor connector maybe shorting the crank signal and causing your problem. Clean, Clean and Clean that connector with contact cleaner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
So, there is lots of oil in the crank sensor electrical connection. There are getting more reports of sensors on the E46's cracking internally and letting coolant or oil through to the electrical connector. The coolant or oil track up to the DME and cause problems. Coolant corrodes the DME pins, usually resulting in a replacement DME. Oil shorts things out and causes fuel trim control problems.

  • Check you DME connectors for contamination, especially X60003, its the biggest one.
  • The oil in the Crank sensor connector maybe shorting the crank signal and causing your problem. Clean, Clean and Clean that connector with contact cleaner.
I did a continuity test and resistance from the sensor plug (not the sensor, but the plug that goes into it) to pins 8 and 21 on x60003 which are crank ground and crank input and both read .8 ohms (my multimeter reads .8 when pressed together so basically 0 resistance) and also checked around all plugins to dme and not a trace of fluid was found. I’ve already used electric cleaner on the sensor so it’s been cleaned already. But like I said when I checked for resistance in the actual crank sensor I didn’t get anything. Shouldn’t I get a lot of resistance between the ground and input voltage in the crank sensor?
 

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E30M3 Race F10 535 R1150Rt M Coupe
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Both precat sensors are brand new as of a couple months ago, spark plugs brand new at same time, coil packs were inspected and not the cause, disa is like 2 weeks old because I got it warrantied after this happened, no mice in garage and I already got a new dme that causes the same problems. I have a closed loop in bank 2 but bank 1 is open due to system error and o2 b1s1 just stays at 1.275 volts. I swapped them around and b1s1 is still at constant 1.275 volts. I think I inspected the fuses last week but I’ll go through them more thoroughly. I’ll get back to you on fuses and multimeter tests, thanks for the reply

Lets divide and conquer.
I would FIRST check for voltage present to the engine (5) fuse pack and voltage OUT. I would also replace all 5 fuses. I have twice been bitten by fuses that looked/tested good but didn't carry enough juice to the sensors. They are cheap!

Testing with a multimeter for O2 function can be very ambiguous. The only reliable way I have done over the years is to have the sensor plugged in (assuming it does get heat/ground etc.) and pulling out the black signal wire and running it THROUGH the meter. Not back-probed.

This is where a good engine scanner trumps the old meter test. You can view data on a screen under all engine operating conditions of; cold, hot, part, full, zero throttle.

Is there oil present ON or IN the connector of the crank sensor? Is there oil inside the harness or ON it?
Two completely different things.

Long thread and I may have missed it? How did you accomplish a second DME and code it to YOUR car?
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Both precat sensors are brand new as of a couple months ago, spark plugs brand new at same time, coil packs were inspected and not the cause, disa is like 2 weeks old because I got it warrantied after this happened, no mice in garage and I already got a new dme that causes the same problems. I have a closed loop in bank 2 but bank 1 is open due to system error and o2 b1s1 just stays at 1.275 volts. I swapped them around and b1s1 is still at constant 1.275 volts. I think I inspected the fuses last week but I’ll go through them more thoroughly. I’ll get back to you on fuses and multimeter tests, thanks for the reply

Lets divide and conquer.
I would FIRST check for voltage present to the engine (5) fuse pack and voltage OUT. I would also replace all 5 fuses. I have twice been bitten by fuses that looked/tested good but didn't carry enough juice to the sensors. They are cheap!

Testing with a multimeter for O2 function can be very ambiguous. The only reliable way I have done over the years is to have the sensor plugged in (assuming it does get heat/ground etc.) and pulling out the black signal wire and running it THROUGH the meter. Not back-probed.

This is where a good engine scanner trumps the old meter test. You can view data on a screen under all engine operating conditions of; cold, hot, part, full, zero throttle.

Is there oil present ON or IN the connector of the crank sensor? Is there oil inside the harness or ON it?
Two completely different things.

Long thread and I may have missed it? How did you accomplish a second DME and code it to YOUR car?
Ok so first, I really don’t think the o2 sensor is the problem, but I do have my old ones that work so I’ll put those in just to make sure. Second, I do use the OBD tool to see voltage from o2 sensor, the problem is that my b1s1 reads 1.275 volts and doesn’t change while the other one barely reads any volts at times (I’ve seen it drop to .008v) and other times looks like it functions normally at .5 volts. For the crank sensor, the plug had oil in the connection and around the plug, so both. Oh and for the dme, I bought one off eBay and flashed the ms430069 on it and took off ews myself. This is not the same software that I started with on my old one, I had ms430056 on my old one and codes still popped up. Reason I didn’t use virgin file is because my inpa doesn’t work for some reason so I can’t sync ews.
 
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