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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I've recently did a major overhaul of my 00' 323's air conditioning system.

I've changed the condenser, dryer, expansion valve, compressor and even the aux fan. $$$$ :banghead: (I know)

However, I bought a non-OEM compressor since my bill was already through the roof and I was looking for bargains by the time I got to the compressor.

Now every time I start my car and then my A/C, it takes a minute or two before the compressor "kicks" in and starts blowing cool air.

Could this be due to my non-OEM compressor? Or something else?

Thanks
 

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Ok...

No prob.

Who/how much refrigerant was put into the system?

Stick a thermometer with a probe, or the equivalent, into the center a/c vent
and after five minutes, what is the output temp? I mean, it also will depend on: is it in the shade or sun? Did it just pull into the shop? Give it time to get cold. There is a lot of heat above the transmission and behind the dash where the air ducts run. It should probably get down into the upper 40s or low 50s, I would think.

There is a test I saw somewhere for the heat-mixing valve where one of the hoses is clamped off and observed... I just can't recall where. Sorry about that. It's just another part of the overall equation is why I mention it...

Anyway, all systems take time to 1. compress the gas 2. send it into the condenser 3. send liquid toward the evaporator 4. it takes a moment for the expansion valve to adjust... 5. the liquid is boiled by the circulating heat in the cabin (expansion valve continually adjusting based on temp change in the evap, right?) 6. the evaporator has to get cold and transfer it to the aluminum fins. THEN you finally get the coldness you seek. It takes "a couple minutes". Are you sure there is a problem?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No prob.

Who/how much refrigerant was put into the system?

Stick a thermometer with a probe, or the equivalent, into the center a/c vent
and after five minutes, what is the output temp? I mean, it also will depend on: is it in the shade or sun? Did it just pull into the shop? Give it time to get cold. There is a lot of heat above the transmission and behind the dash where the air ducts run. It should probably get down into the upper 40s or low 50s, I would think.

There is a test I saw somewhere for the heat-mixing valve where one of the hoses is clamped off and observed... I just can't recall where. Sorry about that. It's just another part of the overall equation is why I mention it...

Anyway, all systems take time to 1. compress the gas 2. send it into the condenser 3. send liquid toward the evaporator 4. it takes a moment for the expansion valve to adjust... 5. the liquid is boiled by the circulating heat in the cabin (expansion valve continually adjusting based on temp change in the evap, right?) 6. the evaporator has to get cold and transfer it to the aluminum fins. THEN you finally get the coldness you seek. It takes "a couple minutes". Are you sure there is a problem?
The a/c system was installed by an experienced shop. So I would think that there was enough refrigerant in the system.

Normally, when you start a car and turn on the A/C, the compressor instantly kicks in and starts blowing cold air. On my car, when I turn on the a/c, the blower turns on but the compressor doesn't switch on until after 1-2 minutes. But after that the a/c unit works fine

Is it because of my non-OEM compressor? The one I have is significantly smaller than the original Seiko Seiki compressor, and it even needs a mounting bracket to be installed.
 
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