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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nah, there's gotta be something else going on. Lets say my car has 200lb springs and your car has 250lb springs. It doesn't make any sense to sell the same 300lb spring to the both of us but label my box "race" and your box "sport" when the endstate handling will be exactly the same. I think we're missing something. Like maybe there's a different in spring perches or sways that make the same springs result in different handling in my car vs. your car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The relative drop is more on non-sport models, hence the word race. It's a non-issue. Stop thinking about it.
I called up H&R and it sounds like you're absolutely right. Interesting. Said another way....If the spring is 50lb stiffer we call it "sport". If it is 100lb stiffer, we call it "race".

So if I want to pull my 200lb springs and swap in 300lb springs it's a "race" upgrade. But if you want to pull your 250lbs springs and swap in the same 300lb springs, it's a "sport" upgrade.

Is it normal for the top several coils of an H&R sport spring to be compressed together by the car's weight? Too bad I didn't ask the H&R guy when I had him on the phone.
 

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I agree with OP. if its the same product then it should be called the same thing. I you buy eibach prokit from a sedan you get a larger drop than you do on a coupe, yet it's STILL called prokit, as it should
 

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OP you are confusing yourself.

It is the same spring. They name it different because the ratio of how much it lowers the car with sport and non-sport suspension is different.

Same spring lowers the car more on the non sport suspension, hence race.
Same spring lowers the car less on the sport suspension, hence sport.

Honestly it is just a marketing gimmick. Giving it different names and all. Same goes with touring and sport springs too.
 

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Yes it's confusing and I didn't understand it till I received my springs. You can put sport springs for sport suspension on a non sport suspension however.
 

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As I said, the resulting effect dictates the name 'sport' or 'race.' On a non-sport, those same springs are more of an aggressive mod than on a sport. Sport is lower and stiffer to begin with.

As for bunching of coils, yes. that's normal for mcpherson struts.
 

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And I think it makes perfect sense to have both names. A non-sport driver like DMAX wants to know of the resulting change that would happen if he installed spring X on his car. He'd see the name 'race' and go GEE that sounds like an aggressive change. Then he can decide from there.

Think of it this way. Two guys go into a barber shop after joining the military. One has a ponytail and one has a short 'fade' haircut. Both have to have their heads shaved. The guy with the ponytail would be getting the race cut while the guy that already has short hair is getting a sport cut. (for those who still don't get it)
 

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I also spoke to H&R. Along with their springs matching for a sport suspension or not, the names are confusing.

H&R Touring Cup Kit - comes with Sport Springs
H&R Sport Cup Kit - comes with springs that you can't buy individually - you could call them "race" springs but they really aren't, because: you can buy

H&R Race springs - two versions - one for sport suspensions, one for non-sport suspensions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok, so that's figured out. What about this tho "Is it normal for the top several coils of an H&R sport spring to be compressed together by the car's weight?"
 

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Ok, so that's figured out. What about this tho "Is it normal for the top several coils of an H&R sport spring to be compressed together by the car's weight?"
Yes it is, plus, Mango answered this question a few posts above this.

EDIT: Also, this is why I decided against getting an H+R Sport Cup Kit to lower my car. It's already on sports suspension and these cup kits do not give it an aggressive enough drop. If you have non-sports suspension then it's a really great drop though. I've decided to just get some coilovers to ensure the drop I get is low enough for my tastes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yes it is, plus, Mango answered this question a few posts above this.
I thought I already answered that
Sorry, I missed that. Altho I'm not sure I understand "normal for MacPherson struts" part. My perception is that this is a spring design issue, not a suspension design issue (MacPherson strut being a suspension design). I'm mostly an e30 guy. Our rear H&R Race springs are half bound up by the car's weight, but none of the front coil's are bound with the car at rest and it has a MacPherson struts front suspension too. The reason the rear springs are half bound up is that H&R was concerned about overall spring length and if they made the spring too short it could pop out when we go airborne over track curbing.

Thanks for your info in this thread Mango, but can you help me understand exactly what you meant with the qualifier "for MacPherson struts"?
 

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it may not be exclusive to mcpherson struts, but in this case with a progressive lowering spring it is. have a look at this picture. even at rest out of the box, they're nearly touching. i doubt this is causing any of your noises:

I never really thought about it and i don't know much about it other than its normal. i dont care. lol

 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
it may not be exclusive to mcpherson struts, but in this case with a progressive lowering spring it is. have a look at this picture. even at rest out of the box, they're nearly touching. i doubt this is causing any of your noises:

I never really thought about it and i don't know much about it other than its normal. i dont care. lol
Ahh, that's a great example. Those tight coils would certainly bind once the car's weight was on them. The bound coils would properly set the spring's height, even if they actually functioned as springs in rebound only. Thanks for the assist.
 

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