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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Lol never said it was meant to be professional, just a fix. So far all the issues i had with my car are gone. No more thump and it actually goes into gear smoother. Professional is like 4500 .This is like 30 bucks for the screws ,plate washers and bolts.


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2003 M3 6MT Slicktop
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Lol never said it was meant to be professional, just a fix. So far all the issues i had with my car are gone. No more thump and it actually goes into gear smoother. Professional is like 4500 .This is like 30 bucks for the screws ,plate washers and bolts.

well to be fair a $4500 fix is when they cut out, and weld in a whole new floor panel and it's better than new with warranty from BMW.

you really need to be sure that bolt you're now using is a high strength Grade bolt. it appears to be a cheap grade bolt.

but this is something i posted about like 7-8yrs ago. here is my thread on a shop doing this years ago.
http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=408895&highlight=active
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Its an aluminum bolt supposedly, and I'm not sure on the plate its pretty heavy iron though. I did it this way because my subframe was only torn from one of the four points, so instead of taking everything down for one mount i found this to be a better solution. Either way as much as it pains me, ill be looking into a g in the near future. Bmw may have great quality engines trannys and interior but this issue has really showed their "german engineering" to be A plus (sarcastically)


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I think the OP is onto something here,........And I'm Not Joking.

First, everyone is really Assuming here; with very little information to base his or her assumption on. His aluminum bolts need to be thrown out & replaced with at least a grade 8 bolt, those steel mounting plates should be welded in, but in reality you could epoxy them in place. I'm not a fan of using epoxy for a repair like this, but many many E46F forum members have successfully done it that way.

This Brilliant but ultra simple fix relies on the fact that your Bimmer has very little to little subframe damage to begin with. Someone with a "torn-up" subframe can't get away with this type of simple fix.

This WILL work and I really endorse it, as long as you are starting with a subframe that's not badly damaged.

The picture below is the best / most comprehensive way to do this, the OP's version is the same thing in its simplest form.

OP, good work. :thumbsup:
 

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As funny and amusing as it may sound, yes it is. I just wanted to share with my fellow fanatics to see if anyone has done it or tried this before.


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Does that stud go through to the bottom of the floor pan? If so, here are the issues with your "repair":

-The floor pan is double walled. You have put a plate on the outer/upper part of the metal, and not the actual surface that sees mechanical stress. Furthermore, the act of you tightening that nut down is putting constant mechanical stress on both the upper and lower pieces of metal.

-You have a big huge threaded stud sticking up in your trunk, preventing you from putting your carpet back in.

-It's on the driver's side. If i'm remembering correctly, the engine rotates clockwise, making torque under wheel resistance push UP on the driver's side floor pan. You can confirm this by looking at BMW's procedure for the structural foam repair, which I believe was only spec'd to be injected on the driver's side (to counteract compressive force). Clearly the metal will see force in both directions, but the majority of the force it sees will be pushing your plate up, not pulling it down.
 

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Its an aluminum bolt supposedly, and I'm not sure on the plate its pretty heavy iron though. I did it this way because my subframe was only torn from one of the four points, so instead of taking everything down for one mount i found this to be a better solution. Either way as much as it pains me, ill be looking into a g in the near future. Bmw may have great quality engines trannys and interior but this issue has really showed their "german engineering" to be A plus (sarcastically)


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As someone who has gone through the subframe repair, I did allot of research and reading on this. BMW did make a mistake on the subframes for the E46 starting with 1999 (and BMW seems to indicate through 2002 or 3). But although they do not admit it, I think they must have done some redesign to strengthen the subframe in 2002 or 3, but the problems clearly continued to exist beyond those years for all E46's. BMW had a program in place to pay for the repair--ending in 2010. The cost of that repair was about $4500 per car. Based on readings, I understand that the E36 had problems with subframe on the front, and BMW thought they would correct that for the E46 in the original design (1999?) by putting a stronger front end on the E46 (compared to the E36). It is my understanding what that did was shifted ALL the stress from the front to the rear of the E46. Almost never hear of a E46 having front end subframe problem. After much research, there is no question for me, that welding is the better way to go, and is the required way if you have a crack. Epoxy method is a weaker method, and will not work on any major (observable) crack on a permanent basis. The problem is that some cracks are hairline and not easily observable---and those are questionable if the epoxy will work, but definitely not as good as welding. In both cases, a custom plate needs to be made if a crack is discovered and the subframe kit (Turner) does not have the exact plate to cover the area of the rip (crac)---which is doubtful. There are something like 8 plates in the Turner Kit--with two of them welded into the truck area --where it is common to crack also. The only way to do this properly and get to all the underside points is to drop out the exhaust system, gas tank (safety), and the rest of it. Otherwise it is not exposed to where you need to get to. Those who lean toward Epoxy is because it is easier, faster, cheaper, and possibly a DIY. But Epoxy will not work it the rip (crack) is apparent--if you have not seen it, it will be anywhere from a few inches to 6 inches long, many times large enough to get your finger almost into,and multiple cracks are not uncommon, requiring cutting a custom plate. Epoxy is a weak fix for that. BMW does not publish information on this, but it appears that with time, the stress builds up on the E46--and I think at least the majority (maybe much more) will encounter this problem. The rips usually occur first on the left side, and many times go to the trunk rear area. To fix the one rip is like doing nothing, the some of the other 6 or 8 stress points are weakened and will rip--maybe most of them. It takes a professional at least 10 to 12 hours of work to do everything, using the welding method. I would not consider the weaker Epoxy method since you need to drop everything out to get to the area needed. However, in fairness to the Epoxy method--it appears to me that if you catch the problem BEFORE stress cracks (meaning hairline cracks/rips) that fix may work. The hairline cracks are very difficult to see--sometimes almost impossible, until they open completely (in several months). But again, that is the weaker of the fix alternatives. These are my observations based on detailed research and understanding what went wrong with so many of the E46 (and previous E36). Lastly, the subframe crack is more normal for those who track/race their E46 or other BMW's, it is has always been common to reinforce it--it you are putting that type of stress on the car. (The E46 was not designed for that type of use).
 

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I agree with you on all this. Also the op should be aware that if that mount tore out through the bottom there is tremendous downward force being exerted there. The metal under his fix plate is less than .060 thick and only one layer. Honestly will that hold? No
 

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I agree with you on all this. Also the op should be aware that if that mount tore out through the bottom there is tremendous downward force being exerted there. The metal under his fix plate is less than .060 thick and only one layer. Honestly will that hold? No
And lets not forget that if the metal has cracked at one location---the other stress points on the subframe have been OVERstressed carrying an additional load ---and are all weakened (just waiting to break through, or a hidden hair-line crack has formed). Fixing the one site that is "broken", ripped, is not a fix at all. It is playing with time.
 
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