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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Its annoying that I need to google the torque of every dang bolt ! Isn't there a site or document I can refer to?

Thanks
 

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what bolts are you doing?
you better find the related DIY's to figure out.
 

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the Oil filter housing bolts = 16ftlbs

the valve cover bolts = 6 ftlbs

the coil bolts = 7ftlbs

Oil filter housing nut = oil filter cap? = 18 ftlbs

the oil pan plug bolt = 18 ftlbs
 

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Bentley is the document that you can refer to...
 

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Every nut and bolt on the entire E46 line up of cars is listed in the Bentley Service Manual. It would be wise to purchase one if you are going to be doing 50% or more of the work on your car. Though having torque specs for all nuts and bolts is a handy thing to have, in most cases, as you gain more experience, "tight" is correct and within the torque range. Most experienced guys (and gals) can easily pull 30 foot pounds with a standard 3/8 drive ratchet. Small nuts and bolts are torqued in inch pounds, so again "tight" is good (not tight enough to break them or strip the threads). Oil filter canister cap, snug using a 32 mm wrench or socket, valve cover bolts snug (which would equal 6-10 foot pounds), oil pan drain plug, snug which would be in the range of 16 to 20 foot pounds. Torque values are given for every nut and bolt because they have to be, and every fastener does have its limits to tightness before threads are deformed and will not hold. You don't want to put 100 foot pounds of torque on a 1/4 inch bolt, or even on the plastic oil filter canister lid. Common sense and experience along with the Bentley Repair Manual will serve you well as you gain more and more experience working on your car. Just some other tips; when changing spark plugs, coat the threads with never-seize compound and then snug them in, the gasket just needs to compress a little on the head, never-seize on the mating surface between your alloy wheels and the hubs, a like coating on grease such as Lubriplate 105, for all rubber gaskets and oil rings. Loctite blue on fasteners requiring it (never use red or green). Talcum powder/baby powder as a lubricant to install bushings (as silly as that sounds, it is a very good dry lubricant). And remember, with Torque Specs there is a "plus or minus" range to the number given (generally the range is plus or minus 5%, so for example; wheel studs could be 76-84 foot pounds).
 

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Every nut and bolt on the entire E46 line up of cars is listed in the Bentley Service Manual. It would be wise to purchase one if you are going to be doing 50% or more of the work on your car. Though having torque specs for all nuts and bolts is a handy thing to have, in most cases, as you gain more experience, "tight" is correct and within the torque range. Most experienced guys (and gals) can easily pull 30 foot pounds with a standard 3/8 drive ratchet. Small nuts and bolts are torqued in inch pounds, so again "tight" is good (not tight enough to break them or strip the threads). Oil filter canister cap, snug using a 32 mm wrench or socket, valve cover bolts snug (which would equal 6-10 foot pounds), oil pan drain plug, snug which would be in the range of 16 to 20 foot pounds. Torque values are given for every nut and bolt because they have to be, and every fastener does have its limits to tightness before threads are deformed and will not hold. You don't want to put 100 foot pounds of torque on a 1/4 inch bolt, or even on the plastic oil filter canister lid. Common sense and experience along with the Bentley Repair Manual will serve you well as you gain more and more experience working on your car. Just some other tips; when changing spark plugs, coat the threads with never-seize compound and then snug them in, the gasket just needs to compress a little on the head, never-seize on the mating surface between your alloy wheels and the hubs, a like coating on grease such as Lubriplate 105, for all rubber gaskets and oil rings. Loctite blue on fasteners requiring it (never use red or green). Talcum powder/baby powder as a lubricant to install bushings (as silly as that sounds, it is a very good dry lubricant). And remember, with Torque Specs there is a "plus or minus" range to the number given (generally the range is plus or minus 5%, so for example; wheel studs could be 76-84 foot pounds).
oh wow. I think he got the idea 3 sentences in..:eek:

TO op, get yourself some good torque wrenches. they will serve your well in a long run.
 

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If you opt to purchase torque wrenches, look for ones that have both english and metric scales on them (you will need an inch pound wrench for smaller fasteners and a foot pound wrench for the larger fasteners). Beam/pointer styles are cheaper but "clicker"/ratcheting torque wrenches are easier to use and quicker, set the value and it slips when you reach it. For the best bang for your buck, check Harbor Freight, the ones that they sell will work for you for years if taken care of without costing you hundreds of dollars, but if you are working in a shop as a full time tech, then go for ones from Snap-On. The ones I use are from Sears since I only use them limitedly thru-out the year. FYI, if you purchase the "clicker"/ratcheting one(s), never store it with it locked on a value, always turn it back to zero when finished and storing. And if you are wondering if they hold their accuracy, they can be sent out and re-calibrated (certain industries that are ISSO Certified require that torque wrenches be re-certified each year).
 

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OP, just be careful with torque on some of these. You have the numbers, but here's the thing...some of them might be deceiving.

For instance, on oil filter cap...it gets sealed as soon as the o-ring drops into the canister. You just keep turning it a bit until the cap is close to the canister...don't add torque once they're together, especially with long handled wrench.

On vcg bolts...just turn them down until they touch metal and stop...you stop them too. You'll have 6 lb-ft very soon while you're squishing it down...it'll stay that way. If you go to the stop and then add 6 ft-lb with long handled wrench, you'll do what has happened here often. You'll break the bolt.

I honestly just make things tight...as appropriate for the sized bolt. There are also generic numbers listed in Bentley by the bolt grade and size.

Finally, technically you're not supposed to use anti-seize on our spark plugs. Some brands evidently call for them, others not. Just go down to flush, then about 1/2 turn more. Go by feel and don't go crazy...though you will getting them off! Just use a pipe as an extension to get extra torque when removing stubborn bolts...it's a lot easier on the bolt and your knuckles!
 

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dmax, the cylinder heads on our BMWs are an aluminum alloy, the threads of a spark plug are steel alloy, any idea what happens between those two metals when they are put together? Galvanic corrosion, the outer free electrons of the 2 metals mix with each other causing galvanic corrosion/a chemical weld bond between the two, in some instances making it nearly impossible to to separate. You can see this on your alloy wheels; the hubs are steel alloy and the wheels aluminum alloy and if neverseize or grease or a gasket isn't used, it is hard to remove the wheels and when you get them off you find lots of white powder and pitting of the wheel mounting area. If you don't trust using neverseize on the threads of your spark plugs, then use some good quality grease, it will help keep the chemical bond from happening.
 

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dmax, the cylinder heads on our BMWs are an aluminum alloy, the threads of a spark plug are steel alloy, any idea what happens between those two metals when they are put together? Galvanic corrosion, the outer free electrons of the 2 metals mix with each other causing galvanic corrosion/a chemical weld bond between the two, in some instances making it nearly impossible to to separate. You can see this on your alloy wheels; the hubs are steel alloy and the wheels aluminum alloy and if neverseize or grease or a gasket isn't used, it is hard to remove the wheels and when you get them off you find lots of white powder and pitting of the wheel mounting area. If you don't trust using neverseize on the threads of your spark plugs, then use some good quality grease, it will help keep the chemical bond from happening.
I think you need some kind of between media for that to happen? like acid or alkaline situation?
anyway, I pulled my plugs out after 10 year and 116k miles, they came out just fine. if BMW didnt use anything, I dont think why we should.
a good idea when taking the plugs out is to get your a breaker bar because the initial break will be pretty tight and you want it to be slow and steady.
but then again I am a small skinny dude. anything above 30ftlbs I cant loosen by using a short ratchet.
 

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dmax, the cylinder heads on our BMWs are an aluminum alloy, the threads of a spark plug are steel alloy, any idea what happens between those two metals when they are put together? Galvanic corrosion, the outer free electrons of the 2 metals mix with each other causing galvanic corrosion/a chemical weld bond between the two, in some instances making it nearly impossible to to separate. You can see this on your alloy wheels; the hubs are steel alloy and the wheels aluminum alloy and if neverseize or grease or a gasket isn't used, it is hard to remove the wheels and when you get them off you find lots of white powder and pitting of the wheel mounting area. If you don't trust using neverseize on the threads of your spark plugs, then use some good quality grease, it will help keep the chemical bond from happening.
Tom, I've read that NGK says not to use anti-seize, ditto Bentley. I believe the plugs are coated with something to prevent corrosion.

Anyway, I just have used my 14" breaker bar and break things loose.

Also, guys should know that using anti-seize or any coating changes the torque value a bit. You'd want to use much less, as the coating is a lubricant. There was a detailed thread on this a while back...no idea how to find it.

Anyway, Tom, I also know most shops use anti-seize on plugs, especially if they know they be taking them out again down-the-road. Me, I have to follow the rules as I make them up!
 
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