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All of us have problems with keeping our wheels clean. Ive heard of a couple ppl saying they make a wax for the wheels which not only gives it a better shine but keeps the brake dust from getting on there so fast. Is this true or just a lot of BS?
 

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Mothers....

Mothers is the best **** on the planet- although it does take a LONG LONG time to do it if you're gonna do it right. I polished my aluminum wheels beyond factory- went up to 2000 wet sand and then used hand glaze followed by religious mothoers applications in the summer- mothers usually takes 2 full doings to get each wheel right, which is at least 1/2 hour per wheel- usually more.

If your wheels are polished aluminum and you want to really make em shine, you can try the wet sanding thing- restores, beautifies- you just have to stay on top of them in terms of protection from the elements
 

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gotta see for yourself... and wet sanding

Sometimes the combination of marketing and mind-over-matter can be a very good way to generate cash!

If you ask people who supposedly know, they'll say the wheel wax allegedly does a better job at repelling things after it's applied and buffed- namely brakedust. I usually use mothers to really polish the **** out of the wheels and get them clean. After, I use a coat of turtle wax or gliptone- either one, and they seem to keep the wheels looking hot for a good couple of weeks... I mean it depends, but assuming it's spring or summer or eaRly fall, and there's not too much crap on the road, they'll stay nice. Is the wheel wax worth the money? you know, as skeptical as i am, it may just be! I used it on another of my old cars at a friends house, and I couldn't believe how good it looked for so long.. but you should try both and see...

Wet Sanding: You wet sand with special paper designed to sand with a thin coat of water- you basically get a bucket of water, a good sanding block- you'll want a firm-sponge for wheels, so it will adhere to the curves and get good surface contact.

wet sanding paper is black- not brown or beige. It's kind of like emory clotch, but it's actually paper, not cloth. still it resists water and lets the water lubricate so it doesn't have such an abrasive effect, but more of a polishing effect. You should start with 400 (320 if they're really messed up) and work all the way through 600, 1000, 1400 and 2000 grit if you want to go nuts. Then a good polish with mothers or hand glaze (3m) finished with a good coat of wax... it's a labor of love, but well worth it~!!!
 

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I got the "Wheel Wax". I took off each wheel, cleaned it and used the wheel wax on both the outside (visible) and inside (back side) of each wheel.

The things seem to get just as dusty just as quickly as before. They're fairly easy to clean now. I think any regular wax would do just as well.

They claim "WheelWax changes the surface polarity of your wheels to repel brake dust particles" on the Wheel Wax website.

I had hopes the wheels would stay cleaner. I now think this claim is probably misleading.

If, indeed, the polarity is changed, perhaps it doesn't matter if the surface polarity is changed. I'd assumed by "changes" they meant "reverses" but I now suppose any alteration of charge would fit the definition of "changes".

Still, my wheels certainly don't "repel brake dust particles" so I assume their claim is based more on marketing strategies than on science.
 
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