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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
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Removal of stock bushings:


1. Loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels while the car is on the ground, then raise the rear of the vehicle and place on jack stands.



2. Remove rear wheels and be prepared to get dirty.



3. Disconnect rear shocks.



4. To allow the trailing arm to drop lower (making it easier to remove the RTAB), disconnect rear sway bar. (This might not be necessary with stock sways, but mine were Hotchkis and were getting in the way.)



5. Locate the front of the trailing arm.



6. Locate 3-18mm bolts and remove. (It will be important to install the bolts and the bushing console in the same position. The bolts leave a mark in the console, so you can use those, or you can use a sharpie to draw circles around the bolts before you remove them.) Be sure to also unclip the wires.



7. Here is the bushing and console after it is lowered.



8. Use an 18mm allen wrench and a breaker bar with an 18mm socket to remove the through bolt. Note orientation of console after removing.



9. Close-up after removing console.



10. Now the fun begins. Since I purchased my RTAB's from TC Kline, they let me borrow their removal tool (with a deposit) for free. The tool made the removal very easy. I highly suggest getting your hands on some type of professional tool before attempting this DIY.



11. Proper pieces of the tool assembled for E46 RTAB removal (this tool kit can also be used to remove other bushing on an E46/E36 rear axle).



12. Tool installed and ready to be used.



13. And after a few turns of the allen wrench...




Installation of new bushings:


1. TC Kline Delrin RTAB's :str8pimpi



2. Use the supplied green Loctite on the inside of the carrier or the outside of the bushings.





3. Slide each end into carrier as far as they will go.



4. Using the tool, assemble the correct pieces for an RTAB installation, and press both sides into the carrier making sure they go in straight.





5. Bushing correctly pressed in.



6. Grease the center bearing (using a non-petroluem based lube). I used Lubriplate.



7. Press bearing through the bushing with your hands. It should glide in without much difficulty. Towards the end I used a rubber mallet to get it flush with the bushings.





8. Grease the inside of the washers.



9. Place washers on the outside of the bushing.



10. Reinstall console and tighten through bolt to 81 ft/lbs.



11. Reposition console (using a jack to raise the arm will help) and reinstall 3-18mm bolts. Tighten to 57 ft/lbs. Reconnect wire and also the rear shock and sway bar if you disconnected it earlier (after completing both sides).

12. Repeat for other side.
 

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Nice scissoring session :eeps:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Nice DIY. Notice any changes in the car's handling aspect?
Huge change. I do believe my stock bushings were shot, but after I put these in, everything is solid. No more dips when shifting, and it now feels like the shocks are doing the work they are supposed to.

The ride quality is more harsh over bumps, etc., but it is not unbearable.

No squeaking either. I think these are a much better design over UUC and Rogue RTAB's. (And Rob, before you post, I have seen your RTAB's.)

Nice scissoring session :eeps:
:thanks:
 

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Price paid? And dam, I wish I was in Cali. I don't know of anyone who would have a removal tool that I could borrow tho :(
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Price paid? And dam, I wish I was in Cali. I don't know of anyone who would have a removal tool that I could borrow tho :(

$146.30 for the bushings

$460.00 for the tool

TC Kline also has a location in Hilliard, Ohio. You basically buy the tool from them, and then return it when you are done and they will issue a full refund for the tool (as long as you don't break it).
 

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Lol dammit. I'm not driving to Ohio to get a tool :( I'll spend $200 in gas money to get there lol. How much do you think a indy shop would charge for install? 1 hrs labor? And is it possible to do it without the tool?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Lol dammit. I'm not driving to Ohio to get a tool :( I'll spend $200 in gas money to get there lol. How much do you think a indy shop would charge for install? 1 hrs labor? And is it possible to do it without the tool?
I called my indy shop before ordering the tool, and they wanted $350 to do the install. You don't have to drive anywhere to get the tool though... they sent it to me from Ohio via UPS.
 

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So it cost you about $160-ish to install stiffer RTAB's to replace old one's...Nice
They much stiffer than OEM?
 

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Hmm. I'll take a look at all my bushing's the next time I change my oil and if need-be put it on the "spring cleaning" list. Along with some re-01r's from a certain someone :eeps:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hmm. I'll take a look at all my bushing's the next time I change my oil and if need-be put it on the "spring cleaning" list. Along with some re-01r's from a certain someone :eeps:
It may be hard to tell by simply looking at the bushing. Mine looked perfectly normal, but when driving I could feel much more bump steer.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Very nice. Do these make noise?. I think ive heard of Derlin breaking, im not sure, Over at the M3forum.
No noise so far. One really nice design is that the inner part (where the bearing goes through) is "rifled". There is a spiral groove machined into the delrin to keep the lube inside. Also, the large metal washers help protect the delrin from the console, and further keep the lube locked in the center of the bushing. I don't doubt that delrin could break - it is plastic after all, but I don't see how these bushings would break inside of the carrier.
 
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