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i finally got to reinstalling the pan and i smeared the gasket sealant and most of it seemed to be pretty dry by the time i got the pan actually mounted. I really do not want to take it off again but i am not sure if the gasket sealant got messed up to the point it will leak again or not. I really dont want to deal with it and just get it back together, but i am at the point where i can still go back and redo the gasket sealant
 

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I also noticed that i broke the rubber damper that was on the subframe that goes against the oil pan when when seated back in position properly. anyone know what the rubber piece is called and if its necessary? im guessing it provides cushioning for the oil pan so the subframe is not touching the oil pan directly metal against metal.
 

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Found it, its called the stop buffer. 22116750744. i understand what it does now. i forgot the engine does have some flex when under load. the stop buffer prevents the oil pan from slamming again the subframe cross member. Its cheap but it looks like no one really has it or can ship it quickly. Im wondering if i can go without it.
 

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Part number for that buffer stop has been superseded to 22116753910, item #11 in the diagram below:

Click to view on RealOEM.

And here's some commentary from MJLavelle from a few years back:

. . .Also, while you are in there, you may want to change out part #11 in the diagram, a bump stop for the engine, part #22116753910. It is a rubber pad between the bottom of the engine, and the cross brace. A lot of times, it gets left out when work is done, so yours may not even be there. But even if it is, it will be worn out. But a worn or missing one can cause a lot of noise, because the engine will rub against the brace, especially when making a turn, or accelerating hard. It gets worse as your motor mounts wear out. It is cheap to replace, and a lot of people miss it.
When I reassembled things, I don't recall that piece coming into contact with anything, but could see it doing so when things are under heavy load.

You're right, doesn't look like a lot of places carry it and best availability I can find is from this guy on eBay: http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...-MOUNT-STOP-RUBBER-SHOCK-BUFFER-/111736568305.

I don't recall the clearance between it and the oil pan, though. Any chance of being able to replace it after the subframe is back in place?
 

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No i will have to drop subframe again to replace it. they have series 4 3 series e46's at the junk yard near me, guess im going there tomorrow. my main concern is the pan. i took to long getting the pan back up, smeared the sealant in the process and noticed its was already pretty dry when i got it mounted, also one of the bolts was really hard to put back in but i am almost positive i didnt cross thread it. its turning into a nightmare, and im not sure if i should take the pan back off to redo the sealant
 

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It bugs me that I may have botched the sealant and I want to check that bolt hole that was really tight so I am going to remove the pan again, happy day! wish me luck. hopefully I can get a second person to help me reinstall this time.
 

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Well, its finally done! took me about 2 weeks to complete the oil pan job, but i did tie rods, lca's, powerflex bushings, m3 engine mounts, replaced the horns in the bumper. i took her out for a spin and noticed some vibration in the wheel and thought, man you can feel everything with these powerflex bushings! Then i realized the vibration was from the loose front tires because i didnt tighten the lug nuts, not even hand tight. this was after doing 60mph for a couple miles. lucky i caught it when i did, it could have been worse. on the bright side i did get to use my euro programmed flashers on the way back which was cool.i really havnt got a chance to use those yet.
 

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Well, its finally done! took me about 2 weeks to complete the oil pan job, but i did tie rods, lca's, powerflex bushings, m3 engine mounts, replaced the horns in the bumper. i took her out for a spin and noticed some vibration in the wheel and thought, man you can feel everything with these powerflex bushings! Then i realized the vibration was from the loose front tires because i didnt tighten the lug nuts, not even hand tight. this was after doing 60mph for a couple miles. lucky i caught it when i did, it could have been worse. on the bright side i did get to use my euro programmed flashers on the way back which was cool.i really havnt got a chance to use those yet.
Well done and hope it stays good. I have bought all parts including new engine lift tool, but cannot build enough guts to do this job, majorly cause my E60 with M54 engine has the active steering bolted on top of the subframe, plus there are tranny coolant pipes blocking the pan bolts.
 

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Well done and hope it stays good. I have bought all parts including new engine lift tool, but cannot build enough guts to do this job, majorly cause my E60 with M54 engine has the active steering bolted on top of the subframe, plus there are tranny coolant pipes blocking the pan bolts.
Hi Saturn, the job felt overwhelming at times, but I took it slow, about an hour a day , and made sure everything was done meticulously, which is why it took so long. The transmission cooling pipes were annoying and in the way on mine as well. i could have saved hours if i had a manual transmission since they don't have cooling pipes/heat exchanger . I found that the pipes flexed enough to get an extension in there to remove the bolts from the pan. A couple of tips I learned after doing this job; I would STRONLY recommend having at least 2 people available when trying to remount the oil pan. I tried it by myself and cross threaded one of the bolts into the block. Someone mentioned using tape just to hold the gasket to the pan while remounting it. I tried that and ended up leaving a piece of tape in there after I mounted the pan back up and ended up having to take it down again and found the tape stuck to the inner gasket seal, so I would also recommend against using tape. While I was in there I found the stop bumper that prevents the subrame from hitting the oil pan had fallen apart. The part number is 22116753910. I waited until I got the replacement bump stop before putting the subframe back together because I didn’t think there was enough room to replace it when everything was put back together, but it looks like this part can also be replace after the subframe is remounted. I have an automatic and the plastic brackets that hold the transmission cooling lines together were brittle and broke. 2 x 17201712210 are needed to replace them. They just snap together when reinstalling. I also replaced replaced the tie rod’s at the same time. Another diy recommended using the same boot’s because oem is $50 a piece. I went ahead expecting to reuse my boots and found out was was torn on the upper side. Not wanting to have to take the tie rod back off to install the new boot, I ordered a good quality $20 boot online and had to wait for it to be delivered before installing the tie rod, so I would also just recommend buying new tie rods boots(which can be had for about $20 a piece) as well so you don’t end having to go through any of that. Again, I would stongly, strongly, recommend at least 2 people for remounting the pan, especially if you have an automatic and the transmission cooler lines are in the way . The DIY was spot on. Thanks anonymous_coward!
 

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I'm going in for this job sometime in the next 2 weeks, I start my 2 week vacation this coming Friday :) so I plan on doing the oil pan gasket, front and rear brakes, fcabs and oil filter housing gasket, oh and shocks n struts too. The oil pan gasket scares me a bit haha.

Thx for the diy info . Greatly appreciated my friend

Sent from my SM-G925V using Tapatalk
 

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I know this is an old thread, but I have an old car. The info is still relevant. I like to have a printed version,when I'm doing my DIYs instead of having my laptop where I can damage it. I've attached a PDF and Word document that I will print out before I start the job. I have added some of the comments in the thread that I found helpful.
I do keep a Bentley handy as well. Hopefully, if the photos from this thread ever disappear, the files will still be around.
Edit: Site doesn't like the Word doc, so the PDF will have to do.
 

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Not difficult just takes time. Check the forecast and start early; hit 104F on my second day :facepalm: Been two years and the bottom of my engine remains spotless — your reward awaits. GL
 

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I just finished this and wow! It doesn't look that bad, but all of that time on your back is tuff on an old man like myself. Thankfully I had a garage, great jack stands, a decent creeper and etc. Getting it apart is fairly straight forward and not that bad. Mine is an automatic and those transmission lines fight you the whole way. Getting the pan back on and all of those bolts back in and torqued down in a timely manner was a pain. But the most difficult part, for me at least was getting the subframe back up and in place. I did it by myself and used a floor jack with a long handle to lift it. A helper would be really nice here or if I ever do it again, I'll probably buy a transmission jack or rig up some other way of lift the subframe because it is awkward and heavy.

I also replaced my FCABs and engine mounts.

Also Simple Green is simply amazing at removing the grime from the pan. I tried dish soap first but wasn't getting anywhere fast. Grabbed the Simple Green, sprayed it down, lightly brushed it, and rinsed it off a couple times. The pan look brand new. Then I dried it out with compressed air.

A tip that might help someone, I zip tied the new gasket to the pan in a couple places (one near the front and one near the back) once I had a few of the bolts started, I cut the zip ties with a pair of side cutters and pulled them out. Worked like a charm.
 

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I realize this is an old post but I wanted to pass on a big thanks for taking the time to do the write-up. I did my oil pan gasket the other day. It's not fun but do-able. As mentioned, good time to do the engine mounts, too. I also recommend a helper when the time comes to mount up the oil pan in place.

A word of warning I hadn't seen mentioned - when you're replacing the two medium length bolts into the pan where it mates up next to the trans bell housing, have some way to secure the bolt to your socket. A little bit of tape, for example. When I was doing one of mine I didn't get the bolt started on the threads like I thought and it turns out the bolt came off my socket and fell into the trans bell housing. Couldn't fish it out with a magnet.

Off came the oil pan and the bolt dropped out but it was a bitch after getting everything in place and bolted up.
 

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I know this is an old thread, but I have an old car. The info is still relevant. I like to have a printed version,when I'm doing my DIYs instead of having my laptop where I can damage it. I've attached a PDF and Word document that I will print out before I start the job. I have added some of the comments in the thread that I found helpful.
I do keep a Bentley handy as well. Hopefully, if the photos from this thread ever disappear, the files will still be around.
Edit: Site doesn't like the Word doc, so the PDF will have to do.
Thank you! My friend recently got this E46 project and it may need the oil pan gasket job. We'll finish first the installation of the shocks and bumper from 4Wheelonline onto the Wrangler this week before we can clear the garage and take a closer look.
 

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A tip that might help someone, I zip tied the new gasket to the pan in a couple places (one near the front and one near the back) once I had a few of the bolts started, I cut the zip ties with a pair of side cutters and pulled them out. Worked like a charm.
Great Tips!

Also, on YouTube, Han's Garage and 50's Kid have great videos on the project.


Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 
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