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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
There was a request on how to carbon coat here in the forum and since I have done it once before
I will try to make a DIY for doing this with pictures from my latest project(sorry***8230;not a bimmer)
All of this was done in my father***8217;s garage and in my condo back in 2005 so don***8217;t make up any excuses
that you don***8217;t have anywhere to do this!!!

1. Start off by thinking of what you are going to carbon coat and see if it is even possible to do so with that
part(sharp edges/corners are really hard to do and should be done professionally with tools such as a
press or whatever they use).

2. Go out and buy carbon fiber mats in the color and size you want + CLEAR epoxy to use with it and READ :read:
the instructions before you start. There is several products out there and my project was done in Norway
with whatever materials I could get my hands on over there.

Here is some places to get the good stuff:
Composite Envisions
Jamestown Distributors
U.S Composites
Fibre Glast Developments
Soller Composites
Protech Composites

3. Take off the part you are going to coat.





4. Make the surface of it the way you want it, in my case I was coating the lower part of the front door trim,
the tweeter panels and two plates to have the condenser and amp on in the trunk of the car I had back then.



I used MDF rings and angled them equally with plastic electric pipes and screws that I drilled into the glass
fiber back that I made for the mid ranges to play inside.





Then I used speaker cloth and covered it all so that I could get an even surface to lay the carbon mats on
and stapled the cloth around the edges after tightening it.





Now add a layer of epoxy to the speaker cloth so that it gets soaked and hard(if one doesn***8217;t do it add more
layers until you are satisfied).

Sand the speaker cloth lightly with 100 paper to take away any sharp tops or fibers that can mess up the
pattern of the carbon mat when you move it around (very hard to make it look nice again if you f*** it up)
if a hole appears you have sanded too much and you have to start over again. Now might be a good time to
make sure the part still fits and that it***8217;s not bent cause of the changes made to it.

5. Put the carbon fiber mat over the part you are coating, move it around carefully until you have the pattern
in the direction you want it and cut the edges about 2***8221; down from desired edge with really sharp scissors.

6. Carefully apply a layer of CLEAR epoxy to the carbon fiber mat(I used a high quality paint brush that the hairs
didn***8217;t fall out of) and really soak it now on the first layer so that you don***8217;t get any air in it and so it sticks.
Now is the last chance to do minor adjustments so check that you have all the edges close to the part like you
want it before it dries. Let it dry.






7. Add several layers of CLEAR epoxy till all of the carbon is covered, but remember that you also have to sand
it down a little bit so put some extra on there so you don***8217;t start to sand into the carbon mat.
Let dry in between each layer.



8. Cut off all unwanted edges and make holes if you want/need any.





9. Now comes the fun job :ben: sanding, I started off with 1000 grit wet sanding paper, then 1500 and ended
up on 2000 until I thought all the surfaces was perfect.
(Yes it is pink, found it in my mother***8217;s laundry room and it did the job)









10. Clean thoroughly and wipe with tack cloth before applying clear coat to the carbon coat.

11. Clear coat (you might want a professional to do this for best results) :eek:







12. Install





And the end results:







I made this DIY while having a couple of Longboard Island Lager from Hawaii so I***8217;m sorry about all errors in spelling
and stuff, but the tutorial is correct :thumbsup:
 

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holly crap....this is awesome....thank you very much for posting....a lot of people like to keep this technique a secret and charge good money for it...glad to see more people sharing their talent with the world instead of keeping it to themselves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
amazing diy, great work
Thanks man :)

holly crap....this is awesome....thank you very much for posting....a lot of people like to keep this technique a secret and charge good money for it...glad to see more people sharing their talent with the world instead of keeping it to themselves.
Thanks, no secret...lol ;)

DAMN! That's awesome! Thanks for the DIY
Thanks :)

How much does a project like that run you? lets say for someone to do a interior trim? But dam great DIY Thanks!
I think I spent like $400 on materials and the rest was just labor that I did my self, a friend of mine stopped by with his paint gun and sprayed the clear coat on everything free of charge so no cost there either. I think the materials are alot cheaper here in the US though. I would not do a whole interior, it will look really ugly with everything in carbon, just pick out certain details or panels that you think would look cool in carbon.
 

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Awesome job! I am in the process of doing this to some of my interior trim. But a question I have is I live in WI where it gets really cold (around 0 degrees) and in the summer up to high 90's. Would the coats of apoxy hold up in humid/hot/freezing type of conditions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Awesome job! I am in the process of doing this to some of my interior trim. But a question I have is I live in WI where it gets really cold (around 0 degrees) and in the summer up to high 90's. Would the coats of apoxy hold up in humid/hot/freezing type of conditions?
Oh absolutely, the epoxy is stiff itself when hardened and with the carbon in it it is hard as hell...remember that I lived in Norway and built the car there and we have colder weather and more rain/snow than WI. Go for it!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

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wow ! i've seen a lot of carbon fiber since joining this site and wasn't impressed by most of it but that looks great. tweeter mounts look first rate.
 

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Wow wish you were my neighbor :rofl:
 

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UnO

Got a couple of questions about your handy carbon finder work. First off, looks sweet, :str8pimpi straight pimpin like the icon suggests and awesome diy. You're right to accentuate some of the panels and leave the rest the same. Makes a world of difference because it makes them stand out all the more. Ok, the questions: What weave did you pick out? I clicked some of the links you've suggested and they had quite the selection of carbon fiber mats to select from. Some being easier to conform to shapes than others. Did you think about this beforehand? How easy was it to mold the mats to the contours you desired? Also, are all types of surfaces able to take the mats? I ask because if I'm going to have some extra sheets laying around I might wanna do this type of work on my motorcycle which has metal and plastic parts. How long of a roll did you purchase? A couple of yards? 20? Thanks for your help!

-B
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Great work!! :thumbsup:
Thanks man

wow ! i've seen a lot of carbon fiber since joining this site and wasn't impressed by most of it but that looks great. tweeter mounts look first rate.
Nice to hear, thanks

Wow wish you were my neighbor :rofl:
LOL

Great work!
Thanks man

wow thats some badass stuff, i would love to try this on some door panels..
Just do it! :)

Fcukin' awesome!! Thank you!!!!!!
Thanks man!!

UnO

Got a couple of questions about your handy carbon finder work. First off, looks sweet, :str8pimpi straight pimpin like the icon suggests and awesome diy. You're right to accentuate some of the panels and leave the rest the same. Makes a world of difference because it makes them stand out all the more. Ok, the questions: What weave did you pick out? I clicked some of the links you've suggested and they had quite the selection of carbon fiber mats to select from. Some being easier to conform to shapes than others. Did you think about this beforehand? How easy was it to mold the mats to the contours you desired? Also, are all types of surfaces able to take the mats? I ask because if I'm going to have some extra sheets laying around I might wanna do this type of work on my motorcycle which has metal and plastic parts. How long of a roll did you purchase? A couple of yards? 20? Thanks for your help!

-B
Thanks for that bcrouse1 :) I see we have the same taste!! I picked the 2x2 weave and I think it was 3k, it was perfect to shape, but as I said in the thread, sharp corners and angles is hard!
I picked that one because it looked the best from the selection I had available at that time! From what I made, the tweeters was the worst cause they were so small and had a lot of angels,
so I had to hang things on the excessive weave around the panel when applying the first layer of resin on the carbon to keep it close to the panel itself. You dont have to use speaker cloth,
but i picked this cause it was thin and easy to work with. You can use blankets or towels if you want too, cause when you apply the resin to it it gets really hard, but then you would have
a lot of work sanding it down to get it even and to keep the weave from losing it's pattern! I just measured how long all the parts that I was going to do was and bought a little extra in case i
messed up... Hope this helps and if you have any more questions just let me know :)
 
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