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Franz lives!!:woot: He's purring like a kitten! Thank you guys so much for all of the help and the great directions. Considering I just did my first oil change less than a year ago, this has been an amazing challenge and confidence booster. My training wheels are still firmly attached (and will be for some time yet), but I'm getting there! :smokin:
 

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My training wheels are still firmly attached (and will be for some time yet), but I'm getting there! :smokin:
I'm in the midst of this now. I have a little more experience than Hatter88.

If you can do this job, there is not a whole lot on the car you can't handle with the right tools. This job is a PTA. I did it as a preventative maintenance, I didn't know how old all the hoses were, turns out they were all good, but the Oil Separator must have been faulty, as it was covered in oil.

Update: Job completed, never recovered one of the DISA bolts I dropped in to the engine compartment and couldn't find it, so going by the dealer to pick one up Monday. Ran out of time and didn't clean the ICV valve. Throttle body looked clean, while attached, but pulled and cleaned the gunk around the spot where the flapper rested. Car is running great. A surprise as I didn't have a purge valve to replace and the car was giving intermittent P0444 codes. I used the BavAuto Kit for CCV for cold weather. Left the insulation off the dipstick hose and put the woven sleeve back on instead, as it was showing no signs of clogging.
Like the Hatter88, I now I fee like I can pretty much handle any DIY under the hood as long as there are pictures or a video to follow.
Next projects are ICV cleaning, purge valve replacement, Voltage regulator, possible DISA rebuild.
 

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It is a helluva confidence booster! Once I finished that, I kinda felt like there isn't anything on my car that I can't fix with enough time and patience. Short of repairs that need specialized (read insanely expensive) tools, I think I can do most of it. I just did a tune-up on our Porsche Cayman S this weekend (plugs, coil packs, serpentine belt), and am going after the lower control arms next weekend. The disa is definitely a PITA, but was well worth it. I ended up replacing all of the hoses, along with the lower intake boot. VANOS is up next...wish me luck! :excited:
 

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PCV Job Done!

I just finished replacing the PCV system on my 2002 325ci. I'm pretty good with a wrench but it was still challenging. It took about 7 or more slow and patient hours and I did it over two days to keep frustration down. The comments and tips on this thread were ESSENTiAL and I am very grateful to everyone who commented!

I would definitely recommend to anyone attempting this job to:

1. Watch the three-part Bavauto video (with the incomparable "Otto here!") http://youtu.be/YWXtiCwRH-k
2. Read this entire thread
3. Get a flexible driver tool for unscrewing hose clamps (I didn't need the Tite-Reach wrench that Otto recommends)
4. Get a small mirror tool to see up and under to throttle body, PCV etc. (One good look makes the job a lot easier)
5. Take pictures at each stage
6. Make a list of the steps/parts as you remove them (check off as reinstalled)
7. Bag and label parts/nuts/bolts as they come off
8. Label electrical connectors with masking tape when unhooked
9. Remove the DISA valve (and check that the flap moves properly)
10. Realize there is a THIRD nut holding the electrical box against the throttle body at its lower back corner (not visible from above) (Otto mentions it later in his video. He had missed it, too!)
11. Lubricate the tube connections on the PCV valve before installing
12. Practice attaching connecting tubes to PCV valve before installing
13. Replace ALL the tubes connected to PCV at the same time
14. Remove oil dipstick (one 13mm bolt) and de-gunk the lower part "tube in a tube"
15. Plan for plenty of time to avoid frustration.

Thanks to everyone for their tips and suggestions on this site. My car now runs great, I saved a lot of money, and it wouldn't have happened without you all!!
:clap:
 

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This thread helped me tackle this project.

symptoms:
5-15 seconds after turning off the engine, the car would sometimes go "pooof" like air compressing, or the release of compressed air...this was random

smoke billowing on startups (random, but got worse)

excessive oil consumption (a quart every week, or 50-100 miles)

not leaking (although i never park on clean areas, so it's difficult to state, as i did have a huge leak that I recently fixed through the valve-cover...but still noticed high consumption, so i did this job.


I have one tip for those who may have difficulties with the dip stick. After reading of your problems, i worked mine up and down ten or twenty times, cleaned it up, and noticed the position of it when removing...

-use tape on the intake, and mark where the top of the tube lines up, so when it goes back, just align it up and mine slid in with 2 or 3 attempts...right on down...very easy.

note, mine didn't have any o-ring when i pulled it out, but put the o-ring on the tube, and it stayed in position until i re-attatched it...

question: is my oil-tube the new or old version?





My oil-separator seemed to be in okay shape, the dip-stick tube wasn't clogged, and all the hoses were ok and only broke one when i purposely broke it to see its breaking point...
I have one hose with this white build up, and ask
is this hose the reason I would (sometimes) see white smoke on startups?



it's the hose that goes into the valve-cover...here's the full shot





here's the old oil separator, and all the hoses (kind of) how it is on the side of the 2002 bmw 325ci (for reference)









the entire affair took 6-7 hours, with setting it up on ramps, preparing my truck to be a work-bench, beer breaks, clean-up, and putting everything away... noon-6:30 was a pretty good work, and very glad i used ramps to save myself from bending over so much...

we all need to invest in a delete kit for this of some sort...b/c it's very tedious.
although i would rate it a 2 beer or 4-5 on the scale, rather then 7-8... because it's all small botls, and just hoses.

I'm glad i removed the DISA, and labelled the connections...there are many more connections than i once thought. 8 or 10 of em, and i only labelled a few, but it was just enough to get it back together correctly.

I wish i was able to remove that electric box, b/c it was in my way all the time...

after all is done, the car drives normal, and hasn't smoked on startup (on my three starts sofar)..

adding that this car has almost 200,000 miles on it, and this was replaced at some point, b/c it was in fairly good shape...except for that junk in the one hose...

so, to follow up
is my dip-oil-tube the new or old version ?
does that one hose make the car smoke on startups?
has anyone else experienced the car expel compressed gas shortly after turning it off?


summary.
thanks everyone for all your chimes, and we can add this car to the list of success stories.
 

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so, to follow up
is my dip-oil-tube the new or old version ?
does that one hose make the car smoke on startups?
has anyone else experienced the car expel compressed gas shortly after turning it off?
You have the old double wall dipstick. The new one is single walled.

That puff you hear after shutting off is normal. Intake vacuum being released.
 

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so, to follow up
is my dip-oil-tube the new or old version ?
does that one hose make the car smoke on startups?
has anyone else experienced the car expel compressed gas shortly after turning it off?
Dipstick tube is the older double-walled version. Cold climate version is single-walled. Comparison: http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showpost.php?p=15091266&postcount=32.

Take a look at this thread on understanding moisture in the crankcase and managing the “mayo”: http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=1057657.

That gasp of air after shutoff is normal and just pressure releasing from the system. See here: http://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?t=1067604.
 

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About to tackle this tomorrow with a friend of mine and, of course, a case of Rolling Rock. Besides the DISA, ICV, Throttle body, and connectors, what else should be cleaned in the process?
 

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About to tackle this tomorrow with a friend of mine and, of course, a case of Rolling Rock. Besides the DISA, ICV, Throttle body, and connectors, what else should be cleaned in the process?

Remove the Air Distribution Plenum and replace the 6 O-rings on it. Clean it out as well.
 

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BTW I'm doing this right now, along with the OFHG. Removing the Oil Filter Housing makes the job easier. I was surprised to find that my car didn't have the cold weather already installed. (11/03 build date)

Be careful not to drop either Oil Separator screw. It will more than likely fall in between the engine and its support bracket, and the dealer supposedly doesn't carry them. (Even though the same screw is still being used on the current BMW's.)

Here's what you can look forward to, minus the Power Steering Reservior and missing alternator.

Vehicle Auto part Engine Car
Land vehicle Vehicle Engine Car Auto part
 

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This is really well done. It still terrifies me to take it on, but the careful directions almost make me want to try. I think it starts with buying some car ramps for my garage.
 

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If you are REPLACING the CCV and hoses not trying to save any, Cut the hoses and u can break the CCV at the Small Part between chambers and save about 20mins on removal. If not remember the Connecting hose is NOT a snap on connection its a 1/4 connection!!!
When reinstalling the Oil separator DO NOT ATTACH THE OIL SEPERATOR to the engine until after first attaching the Connecting hose pictured in Photo 7 or 8. This hose is NOT a snap on connection; it is a 4 turn connection. It is easiest to put this hose on by holding the CCV in your right hand in the position it will be mounted and holding the Connecting Hose in your left hand with the engine side facing the Ceiling, press the hose onto the CCV and turn this hose clockwise until the tip has turned ¼ turn and is now facing you. This is easier than trying to make the connection after the CCV is reattached and risking breaking the Old Brittle Hose or a New Hose from over stressing the Joint.
I just finished this job. My '01 330i wouldn't start and there were no codes. Right before it stopped working, it had started idling very roughly. I had fuel and spark so I suspected a large intake leak. There was a lot of oil under the CCV so it was my prime suspect. After this repair, the car runs great. The instructions in this thread were invaluable and better than the ones on bavauto. I have just one thing to add:

The above discussion about the 1/4 turn connection is a red herring. It's true that you need a quarter turn to disconnect the hose. However, reconnecting is simply push-on. I figured this out after wrestling with it for 20 minutes trying to do it in the manner discussed above. All you have to do is position the CCV, and then push the hose on. You can verify this with the parts off the car before installing them.

Hope this helps somebody!
 

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13 hours - no way!

I'm a pretty novice mechanic and I did it in about 7 hours. It was definitely a pain in the ass, but more from the bending over in the same spot.

You basically pull everything off the driver's side (well, US driver's side) of the engine from top to bottom. It takes a while and is annoying, but do-able if you have any mechanical skills whatsoever.

Any BMW mechanic that took 13 hours to do that job should be ashamed of themselves.
 

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Its not excessively cynical to say that the dealer service department is not the choice for the analytical consumer.
On one hand, they can charge a premium for their brand name, the foot traffic, and the convenience.
On another hand, they can help the sales side of the house by making the older cars look too expensive and reliable
to keep, compare to a shiny new model.

Procure service from a business whose priorities align with yours: keeping your older car running beautifully.

PS, the person who writes up the cost is called a "service writer". They are not the mechanic who does the work.
Find a small shop with bmw experience.
 

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Did CCV change on my 2003 325i with 172000 miles, with the so-called O2Pilot mod: connecting an extra vacuum hose to the CCV, to combat oil consumpion. Youtube certainly helped.

In addition to patience as mentioned, I would highly, highly recommend to go the extra mile and use the intake manifold off method. I cannot see this way is faster - perhaps it is, but here are my hindsight:

1) At some point, you may be so discouraged trying to get all the hoses to connect securely underneath the intake manifold, you may actually question whether the project is doable! So for sanity purpose, just prepare to take the intake manifold off.

2) Let's face it: how can you be sure the connection is actually in position correctly?

3) This is the kicker: the vacuum lines connecting to the valves (there are two of them: one white/black, and one with wire connecting to it) are most likely leaking. I would have to keep the hunt going for vacuum leaks after changing CCV, had I not taken off the intake manifold.

There are also suggestions to replace starter and two hard heater hoses. I decided to check first. They seem to be fine. I did replace the temperature sensor since I happened to have an extra one at hand - the sensor seemed to be quite burned.

One thing about the O2Pilot mod for oil consumption issues: I started out with an oil catch can (and CCV delete). The catch can just did not look right and I always thought the CCV must serve more purposes than a catch can. Search O2pilot to get more details.
 

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Did CCV change on my 2003 325i with 172000 miles, with the so-called O2Pilot mod: connecting an extra vacuum hose to the CCV, to combat oil consumpion. Youtube certainly helped.

In addition to patience as mentioned, I would highly, highly recommend to go the extra mile and use the intake manifold off method. I cannot see this way is faster - perhaps it is, but here are my hindsight:

1) At some point, you may be so discouraged trying to get all the hoses to connect securely underneath the intake manifold, you may actually question whether the project is doable! So for sanity purpose, just prepare to take the intake manifold off.

2) Let's face it: how can you be sure the connection is actually in position correctly?

3) This is the kicker: the vacuum lines connecting to the valves (there are two of them: one white/black, and one with wire connecting to it) are most likely leaking. I would have to keep the hunt going for vacuum leaks after changing CCV, had I not taken off the intake manifold.

There are also suggestions to replace starter and two hard heater hoses. I decided to check first. They seem to be fine. I did replace the temperature sensor since I happened to have an extra one at hand - the sensor seemed to be quite burned.

One thing about the O2Pilot mod for oil consumption issues: I started out with an oil catch can (and CCV delete). The catch can just did not look right and I always thought the CCV must serve more purposes than a catch can. Search O2pilot to get more details.
 
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