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Discussion Starter #1
I just purchased PFC-Z rated pads to replace the Hawk HPS street pads.

I'd like to purchase PFC 01s for my next track weekend but I am on the fence as I've read that you should have dedicated rotors for track pads and street pads.
Some reasons about deposits left on the rotor and possible glazing on track pads that would decrease the performance of street pads.

So whats the story with using the same rotors with your street and track pad? Wouldn't you need to rebed the pads each time after you change the pads? Would bedding street pads be more difficult after track pads were used?
 

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I just purchased PFC-Z rated pads to replace the Hawk HPS street pads.

I'd like to purchase PFC 01s for my next track weekend but I am on the fence as I've read that you should have dedicated rotors for track pads and street pads.
Some reasons about deposits left on the rotor and possible glazing on track pads that would decrease the performance of street pads.

So whats the story with using the same rotors with your street and track pad? Wouldn't you need to rebed the pads each time after you change the pads? Would bedding street pads be more difficult after track pads were used?
I think you're over-thinking it. If you're just doing a couple of events per year (and you're in NY, so you've really only got 6 months to play with), then having an extra set of rotors and pads isn't worth it. At most, I'd have a set of street and a set of track pads (which is fine - lots of guys do this). However, because of the little amount of time you'll be on track and the setup of your car, I'd keep it simple and just get a good set of aggressive street pads (e.g. Carbotech AX6). MAYBE go up to an XP8. But no more than that.
 

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If I was going to track my street car, then I'd get a separate set of rotors (i.e. ATE Blanks) for my track only pads. Rotors are pretty cheap and easy to change.

On a side note, make sure you can get as much cooling to the front rotors as possible. No matter what pad you run, if you don't have decent cooling, you are going to have problems.

Remember, the e46 has one of the best OEM braking systems out there. The ABS unit is top notch and BMW programmed it correctly at the factory. One strength of an e46, is the braking system.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the advice. I'm going to elect buying just the track pads for now. (really lazy swapping out everything) I only do 3-5 track weekends a year.

I didn't think about the 2 pads using similar compounds as my primary concern was bedding them.

For cooling the front brakes, I'm guessing most guys are using the brake duct cooling kit from bimmerworld? Would these fit an E46?

http://store.bimmerworld.com/brake-cooling-kits-and-parts-p45.aspx

 

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Yes.

Those will fit just fine, I've had them on my 330Ci for 1.5 years.

Side note: you will need to wire-tie the 3" ducts in your wheel well. When you turn the wheel to full lock, the tire pointing in has a tendency of rubbing or pulling on the duct. Learned that the hard way.


Good luck.
 

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That looks fine. Again, most of the issues people run into here with braking, all stems from improper cooling. Plus, if you have enough cooling, you don't need to buy really expensive brake fluid. Also, you can buy steering rack stops and that helps keep the brake hoses from getting crushed or damaged. If you are like me, I needed 2 sets of stops because the tire hits the brake duct and sway bar.

In our series, the FWD car teams would sell their first born if they had a braking system like a BMW and the low brake temps.
 

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I've been looking into a dedicated track rotor/pad combo. Looks like PFC06 with blanks is going to be ideal with that bimmerworld ducting kit.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I found some info that I can use. I'm going to stay with the same rotors for the season. More funds to get an extra track day in. How accurate are the comments below?

http://www.stoptech.com/tech_info/wp_bedinfaq.shtml
http://www.zeckhausen.com/avoiding_brake_judder.htm

FAQ #4: What precautions must be taken when switching from street pads to track pads?

If you are changing pad compounds, such switching from street pads to track pads, you need to remove all of the material on the rotor and replace it with a fresh transfer layer of material from the new pads. To be honest, rotors do not like to have different compounds used on them, and virtually all rotor and pad manufacturers recommend that you do not swap pad compounds on the same rotors. The reality is, however, that most customers don't have two complete sets of rotors, so here are our recommendation for managing compounds between track and street use. Note that diligent bedding-in is the key.

When switching from street pads to track pads, one needs to make sure that as much of the street compound is removed from the rotor as possible before aggressive track use. The risk here is that any street pad material remaining on the rotor will be subject to deterioration from overheating. This can ultimately cause severe vibrations due to uneven pad deposits (a smearing of the street pad material on the rotor face).

A common method for removing street pad material is to install the track pad prior to driving to the event. Because most track pads operate in an abrasive mode during regular street operation, driving them to the track will wear off any existing brake pad material en route. You will know when the street pad material is gone by the squealing noises coming from your brakes after a short while…

FAQ #5: What precautions must be taken when switching from track pads to street pads?

Many people make the mistake of thinking that because they have a used set of pads in the past that the system does not need re-bedding when they are re-installed. Remember, the same material must be adhered to the rotor as the pad running against it for effective braking. Race pad material must be removed prior to street use.

Since you're not as likely to overheat the rotors on the street after a track event, over time the street pads will remove and replace the track pad material on the rotors naturally. However, the best solution where street pads are being put back into service after a track day is to follow the original bed-in procedure for the street pads after the swap.

FAQ #7: Is bedding-in on track different than bedding-in on the street?

When bedding-in a system on the track, it is usually neither safe nor much appreciated if you start braking to a near stop multiple times per lap, so a different approach is necessary. A good rule of thumb is to start with 2 or 3 warm-up laps, slowly and evenly bringing the system up to temperature. Follow immediately with 2 or 3 laps at speed. Note that more laps may be appropriate for a light braking track, and fewer for a heavy braking track. Ambient temperature should also be a consideration, as a cooler day requires a few more stops at speed.

After several laps at race pace using normal braking sequences, back off and let the system cool for 2 or 3 laps while staying off the brakes. Out of courtesy, maintain a reasonable speed and signal other drivers you are not running at full song.

Following the cool down laps it is usually best to come into the pits and let the system fully cool. However, track time is typically limited so staying on course is compelling. If the brakes are firm and vibration-free, take it back to speed and you'll likely be OK.

Use Race Pads as a Tool to Remove Deposits from Rotors

If you install race pads before your track event and drive around normally, the race pads will polish away the transfer layer left behind by your street pads. This leaves you with nice, clean rotors which may be bedded with your race pads when you are at or near the track.

After the track event is over, you should not switch back to street pads right away. Instead, drive home from the event using your race pads. As they cool down, the race pads will once again go into pure abrasive mode and polish away their own transfer layer from your race weekend. Cold race pads will even cure judder problems from pad deposits accumulated during the track event. By the time you get home, the rotors are polished clean and ready for you to install and bed your street pads.

In essence, you are using your race pads as portable brake lathes. The race pads are a tool for removing unwanted transfer layer before and after your track event.
 

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phamine, exactly my thoughts! Good read. I would still get dedicated rotors if you have the resources/time.


now.. PFC06 is backordered from carbotech, anyone know where to buy them?
 

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After my little track day weekend on friday and feeling brake fade and even smoke from the brakes from about 5-7 fast laps gots me wondering if i am in the need for a upgrade. The pads i have are nearly still full but i did turn the rotors a nice little purplish color vs the silver color im used to seeing at the end of the day.

I have a aftermarket bumper that has brake ducts built into it. Then i notice a huge heat shield in the way that i know is getting in the way of the brake ducts to cool the rotors. Am i safe in removing those dust/heat sheilds from the brakes?
 

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bimmerworld brake ducts require you to eliminate the stock duct Shields for the ducts backing plate

Sent from my DROIDX using Bimmer
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Just bought some pfc 01 for $390 front and back. Man, these are expensive pads. Hopefully I can brake later and harder like alloy of people say.
 

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You can. And they last a lot longer on the track.
 

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Dedicated rotors for the front only

I use PFC06 all the way around and don't bother swapping rear rotors. Brake duct kit like you posted is great, as is a mechanic with a plasma cutter who can torch off the rear dust shields to aid in cooling.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
:shhh:
I use PFC06 all the way around and don't bother swapping rear rotors. Brake duct kit like you posted is great, as is a mechanic with a plasma cutter who can torch off the rear dust shields to aid in cooling.
How did you use the hand brake done they require the shield to mount the parking brakes?
 

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I'll have to get a pic and I'm not looking at it but either A) handbrake doesn't need the plate or B) you leave enough for the hand brake to function but remove the rest.
 
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