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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently diagnosed my e46 and found a leak coming from under the intake manifold and it’s leaking on the block. I have a video and some pictures. Not sure if the block is cracked or the heater inlet pipe is leaking.

When I apply my pressure tester to the cooling system I can really tell if it’s leaking from hose or the block. help plz
 

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Hmm, your block is very clean and so why the BMW goddess punished you?

The second pipe in post #7 is leaking at its front end, but you should replace both pipes.
 

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I vote for the hard coolant lines and suggest genuine BMW, I would not waste my time with aftermarket ones for this job.
 

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The plastic pipes. They are like 30 bucks each at fcpeuro.com


Given all the time it takes to get them out, this is one (relatively rare)
case where I spring for the BMW baggie. Yes, it may not be any
better than Rein- but then again, for the $40 difference total,
I don't want to find out.

The Vaico pipes don't fit, btw.

t
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
well after taking my intake manifold off I found that’s it certainly was the plastic coolant pipes, do you guys have any suggestions when taking them off cause I saw a lot of videos of them stuck in the cylinder head struggling to pop off

In the photo (I know it’s hard to see) you can partially see the puddle of coolant under the heater inlet hose. I am 100% this is my leak. Also if you guys want to suggest, what else can I replace as preventative maintenance. I have already replaced my PCV system a couple thousand milesback and they look clean on the inside. Thank you for your help.
 

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Brave man who pulled the intake with no fear!

Did you disconnect the fuel rail from the hose connector? It makes the job easier. Make sure to run the pump a few seconds to flush out the debris that fell in and contaminated the o-ring seals before installing the fuel rail back.

RE Pipes: remove the nut/bolt and pull the top pipe, and if needed use a big screwdriver as leverage. It might break off at the head but no fear. Just use a pointed pick to carefully stab into the remain rotted pipe in the hole and break it up. Don’t scratch the aluminum hole wall. Then, go to China Town and order Chinese food and ask for the plastic chopsticks. Take one and break it in halves, and use the sharp broken edge of the hard plastic chopstick to scrap and clean the hole.



On the new pipes. I removed the two O-rings and used a sharp blade to smooth out any ridges on the molding process, in the O-ring grooves. Coated the O-rings and the hole before installation to avoid damage the o-rings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Brave man who pulled the intake with no fear!

Did you disconnect the fuel rail from the hose connector? It makes the job easier. Make sure to run the pump a few seconds to flush out the debris that fell in and contaminated the o-ring seals before installing the fuel rail back.

RE Pipes: remove the nut/bolt and pull the top pipe, and if needed use a big screwdriver as leverage. It might break off at the head but no fear. Just use a pointed pick to carefully stab into the remain rotted pipe in the hole and break it up. Don’t scratch the aluminum hole wall. Then, go to China Town and order Chinese food and ask for the plastic chopsticks. Take one and break it in halves, and use the sharp broken edge of the hard plastic chopstick to scrap and clean the hole.



On the new pipes. I removed the two O-rings and used a sharp blade to smooth out any ridges on the molding process, in the O-ring grooves. Coated the O-rings and the hole before installation to avoid damage the o-rings.
For the fuel rails I ended up not taking them out I managed to move them out the way a bit and covered the fuel injectors with the napkins I put in to cover the valves
Let me know if I did anything wrong that you can see in the picture. Everything seemed smooth as butter when taking it off.
Also I’m on my way to the stealership to get the parts lol
 

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2004 330xi Manual, 2019 X3 M40i
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Pretty sure Rein is OEM
I got the rein from fcpeuro but the tab was broken so I re-ordered the bmw oe part. I Also noted that the rein block end was not perfect. The end was not flat like the plastic injection mold did not fill completely. On the other hand the bmw part (also from fcpeuro) was perfect. So I would go with the bmw oe version in this case.
 

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I got the rein from fcpeuro but the tab was broken so I re-ordered the bmw oe part. I Also noted that the rein block end was not perfect. The end was not flat like the plastic injection mold did not fill completely. On the other hand the bmw part (also from fcpeuro) was perfect. So I would go with the bmw oe version in this case.
That sucks. I've never had an issue with anything Rein from FCPEURO. Regardless of what you get from FCPEURO it's covered for life and they give you zero hassle and they are super quick. Anything from them is good in my book because of its not, they take care of it pronto.

Unlike ecs tuning or turner... same company.... they suck.

Summit racing is another great place to get stuff from.... but they are a more generalized car parts place. Not much bmw specific parts. I get my consumables, some tools, oils and coolants from them. They ship out fast too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I’ve been getting parts these couple days and I have been wondering do I have to remove this( OFH to vanos line) in order to replace the coolant hoses because I have no room to wiggle the hoses to pop them out of the head.
 

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2004 325i automagic
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Yes, it will make life easier, remove the vanos oil line. Get four new crush washers for the two banjo bolts on each end. Shouldn't be too expensive at the dealer.

If that oil line is leaking where the metal end crimps onto the rubber hose, then this is a good time to replace the line as well.
 
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