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BMW 320i 2002 e46 5spd manual RHD
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Discussion Starter #1
So today my father and I tested the pump and well the pump did not work, as expected.... Unfortunately I do not at the moment have the means to buy an OEM pump, so we retrofitted an OEM Mitsubishi Colt trailbuster 2.4i fuel pump.

At first I was sure it would run lean or have fuel starvation. But to my surprise it works perfectly, no codes no smoke no hesitation no lights no problems.... Even tested it with a low RPM throttle down and it immediately puts out power...

I almost want to say more power than it had before, but I'm sure it's just some after effect of my brain... This pump is not permanent it's a temporary solution until I have the means to buy the OEM vdo pump.

The pump was still OEM that came out of the car, it was never changed before, also still had the original clip and could clearly see the tank has never been opened.

Here's a pic of the OEM pump and the Mitsubishi OEM pump we had to retrofit it but hey it works!

913567


After fixing the fuel pump problem we decided to get it over and done with and change the central rubber coupling thingy.

New:
913568


Old

913569


This coupling was not easy to replace, took around about 4 hours. we had little space to work as the car was only up on ramps

913570


But after some cursing words I never knew that I knew, some head banging, some throwing of tools, the job was done.

Took the car out for a good 30-minute drive.
Including low speed .....high speed.... low RPM throttle.... high RPM throttle and just baseline throttling/ coasting.... Fuel usage seems better power seems better and all together the ride is just good...

Thanks to everyone for all the suggestions help and replies on my thread about fuel pump questions!!
 

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BMW 320i 2002 e46 5spd manual RHD
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Discussion Starter #2
Also can anyone tell me what this is, found inside my tank compartment
Those brick looking like things
913571
 

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2004 325i automagic
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Hmm ... wrapped "bricks" in the tank? Sounds like a drug bin joke in the making ... cut them open, but don't post any evidence online.

Also, good idea to update the other thread with the conclusion, or at least post a link to this thread there. It's good to keep the resolution in the same thread as the problem so others reading first thread know what solved it.

Nice work on the retrofit, btw. It's always good to have options.
 

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BMW 320i 2002 e46 5spd manual RHD
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Discussion Starter #4
Well the bricks was not in the tank... it was in the area just above the tank but still underneath the initial metal with four bolts... It has electrical so going to it....so I'm guessing it's kind of a tracking device...

I will post a link in the other thread thank you for reminding me
 

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So today my father and I tested the pump and well the pump did not work, as expected.... Unfortunately I do not at the moment have the means to buy an OEM pump, so we retrofitted an OEM Mitsubishi Colt trailbuster 2.4i fuel pump.

At first I was sure it would run lean or have fuel starvation. But to my surprise it works perfectly, no codes no smoke no hesitation no lights no problems.... Even tested it with a low RPM throttle down and it immediately puts out power...

I almost want to say more power than it had before, but I'm sure it's just some after effect of my brain... This pump is not permanent it's a temporary solution until I have the means to buy the OEM vdo pump.

The pump was still OEM that came out of the car, it was never changed before, also still had the original clip and could clearly see the tank has never been opened.

Here's a pic of the OEM pump and the Mitsubishi OEM pump we had to retrofit it but hey it works!

View attachment 913567

After fixing the fuel pump problem we decided to get it over and done with and change the central rubber coupling thingy.

New:
View attachment 913568

Old

View attachment 913569

This coupling was not easy to replace, took around about 4 hours. we had little space to work as the car was only up on ramps

View attachment 913570

But after some cursing words I never knew that I knew, some head banging, some throwing of tools, the job was done.

Took the car out for a good 30-minute drive.
Including low speed .....high speed.... low RPM throttle.... high RPM throttle and just baseline throttling/ coasting.... Fuel usage seems better power seems better and all together the ride is just good...

Thanks to everyone for all the suggestions help and replies on my thread about fuel pump questions!!
So what did you have to drop to replace the guibo? Exhaust? Centre shaft bearing? Heat shield? All that good stuff? I am just wondering what the minimum amount of effort. had a new one for ages. Just need to get around to putting it on.
 

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BMW 320i 2002 e46 5spd manual RHD
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Discussion Starter #6
So what did you have to drop to replace the guibo? Exhaust? Centre shaft bearing? Heat shield? All that good stuff? I am just wondering what the minimum amount of effort. had a new one for ages. Just need to get around to putting it on.
All of the above, literally all of the above, I tried to maneuver a lazy way to do it,,, but I had no success, you have to drop the mounts holding the exhaust and loosen the bolts holding it...

Then you have to drop the heat shield....

Then you have to pull the heat shield out....

Then drop the central heating, movie to the side and pull it down further... Then there shall be enough space to get that coupler out and the new one in....

Just a quick tip: try and do it in a workshop with a lift, all I had was ramps that we built not too long ago ourselves, space was minimal and was hard AF, I burned my hands cut my arms, and destroyed my eyes with debris..... Just because of the less amount of space to work....

Btw the heat shield is a bitch to get back in!
 

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All of the above, literally all of the above, I tried to maneuver a lazy way to do it,,, but I had no success, you have to drop the mounts holding the exhaust and loosen the bolts holding it...

Then you have to drop the heat shield....

Then you have to pull the heat shield out....

Then drop the central heating, movie to the side and pull it down further... Then there shall be enough space to get that coupler out and the new one in....

Just a quick tip: try and do it in a workshop with a lift, all I had was ramps that we built not too long ago ourselves, space was minimal and was hard AF, I burned my hands cut my arms, and destroyed my eyes with debris..... Just because of the less amount of space to work....

Btw the heat shield is a bitch to get back in!
That's what I figured. I think it's a shop job. I haven't got a lift. I did consider at one point lifting the car front and back one side and doing it from the side. Just don't now where the tipping point is. Unless I lift it up on four axle stands. Never done that before. Just a bit nervous about doing that though.
 

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BMW 320i 2002 e46 5spd manual RHD
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Discussion Starter #8
That's what I figured. I think it's a shop job. I haven't got a lift. I did consider at one point lifting the car front and back one side and doing it from the side. Just don't now where the tipping point is. Unless I lift it up on four axle stands. Never done that before. Just a bit nervous about doing that though.
We put the front wheels up on a ramp and the rear wheels were jacked up underneath the shock absorbers one side a little bit the other side a little bita... one side a little bit the other side a little bit.. so not to tip the vehicle over..
Make sure the front wheels are locked down and cannot move backwards or forwards on any circumstances.... Also put a Jack stand under the crossmember thing underneath of the diff

You can do the job as long as you're not as fat as I am... The scariest thing is the stomach getting stuck... And that happened a couple of times with me..😂😂😂
 

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We put the front wheels up on a ramp and the rear wheels were jacked up underneath the shock absorbers one side a little bit the other side a little bita... one side a little bit the other side a little bit.. so not to tip the vehicle over..
Make sure the front wheels are locked down and cannot move backwards or forwards on any circumstances.... Also put a Jack stand under the crossmember thing underneath of the diff
You have this part backwards ... lift from the crossmember brace (part of rear subframe) in the center and put the jack stands under the plastic "jack pads" on the sides .... those things are for using the emergency jack to lift one side to replace a flat.

Lifting the rear is easy if you use the center jack point, its lifting the front from the center jack point that can be a challenge for some who have the later aluminum reinforcement plate.
 

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That's what I figured. I think it's a shop job. I haven't got a lift. I did consider at one point lifting the car front and back one side and doing it from the side. Just don't now where the tipping point is. Unless I lift it up on four axle stands. Never done that before. Just a bit nervous about doing that though.
If you learn how to lift the car using the center jack points (front and rear), and use a proper floor jack with at least a max lift of 18.75", then you will be able to evenly raise the car (first front, then rear) evenly onto four jack stands. Alternate raising the front and the back 2 or 3 clicks at a time to keep car relatively level, and you can lift it up to 5 or 6 clicks on 3 ton jack stands and have plenty of room to pull exhaust and service driveshaft at home.

When you lower, again lower front 2 or 3 clicks on the jack stands, safely put car on the lowered stands, pull the floor jack, move it to the rear and then lower the rear jack stands a couple clicks below the front ones (or onto floor if close enough). Repeat as needed until both ends are on floor and take your time.

If your work space is level, then a 2 or 3 click difference between front and back will not create a dangerous imbalance if it is just temporary as you raise/lower the car ... just don't go under the car until it is level. Also, make sure you are on concrete and not asphalt or another soft surface.

Fyi, 50skid shows how to lift the front from the center front and rear lift points at beginning of video:
 

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E30M3 Race F10 535 R1150Rt M Coupe
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Not factory, GPS and/or tracking?
 

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BMW 320i 2002 e46 5spd manual RHD
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Discussion Starter #12
My jack points in the sides are completely torn out by prev owner, and i didn't want to jack it up on bare body metal
 

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My jack points in the sides are completely torn out by prev owner, and i didn't want to jack it up on bare body metal
But you jack it up from the center lift point, the dark metal cross brace in front of the rear diff (like in the 50s kid video), not the sides. I use a hockey puck in the saddle of my floor jack to protect the cross brace, but a piece of scrap wood works also.

If the jack pads on the sides are missing, and metal is mangled so they can't be replaced, then I use small blocks of wood between the jack stands and the body metal. If I can I keep the floor jack under the rear center lift point as a failsafe, but it's not a primary method of supporting the car ... the jack stands at the sides are for that.

Having a single jack stand in the center of the car is not safe at all, the car could tip, especially if you are really torqueing something down at the wheels with a lot of force. Two jack stands on the sides is much more stable. That the front is on ramps makes it a little better, but it is still a bad (non ideal?) procedure to get in the habit of doing. Plus at some point you may need to drop the rear diff for service or to do rear bushings, so you will need to know how to support from sides anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
But you jack it up from the center lift point, the dark metal cross brace in front of the rear diff (like in the 50s kid video), not the sides. I use a hockey puck in the saddle of my floor jack to protect the cross brace, but a piece of scrap wood works also.

If the jack pads on the sides are missing, and metal is mangled so they can't be replaced, then I use small blocks of wood between the jack stands and the body metal. If I can I keep the floor jack under the rear center lift point as a failsafe, but it's not a primary method of supporting the car ... the jack stands at the sides are for that.

Having a single jack stand in the center of the car is not safe at all, the car could tip, especially if you are really torqueing something down at the wheels with a lot of force. Two jack stands on the sides is much more stable. That the front is on ramps makes it a little better, but it is still a bad (non ideal?) procedure to get in the habit of doing. Plus at some point you may need to drop the rear diff for service or to do rear bushings, so you will need to know how to support from sides anyways.
This is correct! I agree, it is definitely not ideal, and kinda scary when torqueing down stuff, i really do need jacks thats low inuff..but ill still get down to getting those....
Next will hopefully be a control arm replacement on both front sides...after i got a new vdo pump ofcourse
 
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