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Discussion Starter #1
not for me, but for a buddy with an '02 330Ci

already did a search, after reading a dozen disjointed posts only picked up a couple of bits of information, so apology if this is a repost

saw where the dual Vanos gears have to be swapped from the OE cams to the aftermarket cams. Is this the case for all aftermarket cams? Our only local resource for BMW engine work is the Stealer, so what are the procedures/tools for doing this?

how noticable are the cams with regard to drivability? Lopey or rough idle, etc?

thanks

JJ
 

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the vanos gear has to be indexed to the cam, if not then it'll be off and throw codes. the dealer does not have a tool for this becouse when they replace the cams the new ones from BMW already have the gear attached. some companies have made a tool that indexes the gear some have not and rely on an experienced mechanic to do the swap.

i did it myself but wouldf not recomend it as a DIY, i have many tools the normal mechanic would not have due to my dads retirement years ago as a tool and die maker. i got his shop. even still it wasn't easy as the new cams need to be profiled to see where the match up with the factory ones. not saying its impossible or not worth it but requires some knowledge of the vanos system. in most cases people will have it done close enough and the DME will read end/start stop location as being off in degres of TDC. there is an acceptable varience inthe system so most wont get a fault code unless its further off.

if you search i posted about a 1yr ago an indepth articale and how to on the cams.

oh and the new agressive cams make a noticable difference through out RPM range. same idle not lumpy becouse most of the cams available are not that agressive. the exhaust note is much improved though.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
SMG,

if you're refeering to the writeup you did on Vanos, that is too general. I understand what the system is and how it works. I read through all the other threads you started and didn't see to much other info. If you posted it in somebody else's thread then it's as good as lost because I don't have time to sift through 13 pages of threads the search engine comes up with that you responded too.

my dealer can handle the general dual vanos install. I need to understand more about the gear swap, I'm not a kid with a few hand tools living in an apartment, I have access to fabrication and machine shop equipment. I assume the gear is a press fit and it sounds as if it is not mechanically indexed to the camshaft by a key/slot/etc. Is this correct? It should be fairly easy to index the gear position relative to a cam lobe centerline and then position it accordingly on the new cam.

does this need to only be done on Schrick cams or does Technik, etc. also require swapping over the vanos positioning gear?
 

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I have detailed instructions from the Repair manul CD for the following subjects. It gives you the details to do the following and tells you which special tools are required.

Replacing camshaft (M52TU/M54)
Checking camshaft timing (M52TU/M54)
Removing and installing/replacing piston for chain tensioner
Adjusting camshaft timing
Removing and installing or replacing double VANOS adjustment unit.
 

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Team330ZHP said:
SMG,

if you're refeering to the writeup you did on Vanos, that is too general. I understand what the system is and how it works. I read through all the other threads you started and didn't see to much other info. If you posted it in somebody else's thread then it's as good as lost because I don't have time to sift through 13 pages of threads the search engine comes up with that you responded too.

my dealer can handle the general dual vanos install. I need to understand more about the gear swap, I'm not a kid with a few hand tools living in an apartment, I have access to fabrication and machine shop equipment. I assume the gear is a press fit and it sounds as if it is not mechanically indexed to the camshaft by a key/slot/etc. Is this correct? It should be fairly easy to index the gear position relative to a cam lobe centerline and then position it accordingly on the new cam.

does this need to only be done on Schrick cams or does Technik, etc. also require swapping over the vanos positioning gear?
my appologies, i wasn't infering that you may not be able to do it. i just wanted to be clear that it isn't for everyone. that being said,
what i was able to do was siple but involved. the vanos gear is bolted on to the cam and requires holding the cam, i used a 10" table vise and the block end to hold em still. first find the lobe center line on the #1 cylinder, mark it's relationship on the front plate above the gear, the gear has a double wide tooth valley to accomodate the cup gears alen pin. this wide tooth valley can be used to located the gear to the #1 TDC. scribe this also onto the front. you'll then have two scribe marks running radially from the center that can be measured in degres and copied to the aftermarket cam. the other way is to fabricate a plate that uses the bolt pattern of the front, one is triangular the other is round. the plate only needs an index marker, i.e teeth or a point that is fixed to relocate the gear.

also for some of the aftermarket cams the duration is changed, this affects the vanos assymbly. there is a spring plate washer with three slots, as the new cam travels the slots will impede upon the bolts in them becouse of this. it takes a few revolutions to see it. these plates need to have those slot openings increased in degree rotation. if you PM with a fax number i can fax over the pages and torque settings along with some notes.
hope this helps.
 

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To get an idea of the what the "double tooth" looks like, here's some pics...

Inlet

<img src="http://63.249.202.221/images/dv_inlet_mark.jpg">

Exhaust

<img src="http://63.249.202.221/images/dv_exhaust_mark.jpg">
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
SMG,

Thanks, think I understand now. I have all the ETK/TIS info :eeps: so this all makes sense now. This must be the assy. at the front end of the OE cams that the TIS warns not to remove the screw from. Oh, and I didn't mean to imply you were implying anything, just trying to get you to open up and give me the goods :pimpin:

Technik, looks like bad links for the pics (edit: nveer mind, working now, that clears it up compltely, thanks :) )

peace



smg said:


my appologies, i wasn't infering that you may not be able to do it. i just wanted to be clear that it isn't for everyone. that being said,
what i was able to do was siple but involved. the vanos gear is bolted on to the cam and requires holding the cam, i used a 10" table vise and the block end to hold em still. first find the lobe center line on the #1 cylinder, mark it's relationship on the front plate above the gear, the gear has a double wide tooth valley to accomodate the cup gears alen pin. this wide tooth valley can be used to located the gear to the #1 TDC. scribe this also onto the front. you'll then have two scribe marks running radially from the center that can be measured in degres and copied to the aftermarket cam. the other way is to fabricate a plate that uses the bolt pattern of the front, one is triangular the other is round. the plate only needs an index marker, i.e teeth or a point that is fixed to relocate the gear.

also for some of the aftermarket cams the duration is changed, this affects the vanos assymbly. there is a spring plate washer with three slots, as the new cam travels the slots will impede upon the bolts in them becouse of this. it takes a few revolutions to see it. these plates need to have those slot openings increased in degree rotation. if you PM with a fax number i can fax over the pages and torque settings along with some notes.
hope this helps.
 
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