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Hello Folks:

On a whim, I decided to upgrade my perfectly usable Powerslot/Axxis Ultimate setup with a set of those new cross-drilled BMW Motorsport rotors. The fronts are floating and have a sexy aluminum "hat", along with some very cool directional cooling vanes (no pun intended).

I was 100% satisfied with the Axxis Ultimates that I used with the Powerslot rotors (and I must add that I was 100% happy with the PS rotors too), so I ordered a new set of Ultimates, these coming in a PBR box (PBR Ultimates and Axxis Ultimates are the same exact pad).

I have also been long intrigued by the Turner Motorsport solid caliper bushings, so I ordered a set of those as well.

In two or three separate posts, I'll upload a set of pictures.

And Toby (aka TKC), your free Powerslot/Ultimate brake package is ready. Based on the thickness of the new pads, the Ultimates I'm giving you are about 1/4 worn. You will not be disappointed! See you next week.

Scott
 

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Pictures of combination of both left and right front, before and after. Included are pictures of the old style BMW bushings and the new style TMS cailper bushings. There also a great picture of the aluminum hat on the front rotor. You can see how pins hold the rotor to the hat (this is the floating part of the design).

The copper colored "grease" on the hub is anti-seize compound. Not only does this keep your wheels from sticking to the hub center, it prevents your rotors from seizing on the hub centers.

We've all read the horror stories about people having to use sledge hammers to get their wheels or rotors off. Using copper-based anit-seize will keep this from happening to you.

And Toby (aka TKC), the Powerslots had been on the car for about 30,000 miles. I put anti-seize on those when I installed them. You'll be happy to know that the Powerslot rotors came off so easy it was as if they had been installed just 5 seconds before.

Scott
 

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Here's some pictures of the left rear, before and after. Also, some shots of the left side front and rear through wheels.
 

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One of the keys to vibration free brakes is proper preparation of the hubs. The hub must be clean of all rust and old grease. My car is a unique case because its never seen a single day of rain in its California existence. Regardless, I still clean them throroughly anyway. Doing this will help ensure your rotors mate proper on the hub, which means they won't have side-to-side runout (which can cause a pulsating brake pedal).
 

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Another essential part of a brake job is cleanliness, cleanliness, cleanliness!

Attached are a set of pictures showing where the pad/caliper holders must be clean of all debris where the tabs on the brake pad backing plates mate with the recesses in the holders. Failure to do this is what causes squeal and uneven wear between the inner and outer pads. Be sure to clean the mating surfaces where the holder bolts to the suspension too.

Also, see how I use my floor jack to hold the caliper? Never ever hang your cailpers by the flexible line, OEM rubber or stainless, it makes no difference. Also, never ever turn your caliper such that the flexible line is twisted along its length!

One other thing that is ultra-important - USE A TORQUE WRENCH!

I have a slew of other pictures. If anyone has any questions or needs to see some other picture, just let me know.

Scott
 

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A few more thoughts...

When retracting the caliper pistons, be sure that your brake resevior doesn't overflow. You may have to suck brake fluid out to make room.

I also recommend "pumping up" the brake pedal after you do each corner (engine off). When you fully retract the caliper piston, there will be a slight gap between the pads and the rotor. Pumping up the pedal will "seat" the pads.

A possible scenario - suppose you did all four corners and didn't pump up the pedal. You're happy your job is done and you joyfully back of the the driveway to try your new brakes.

Your dog, your best friend, is asleep in the driveway behind the car, just hanging with you. Your canine friend loves you like you're a god. As you back up you realize he's behind the car. You stab the brakes and the pedal goes to the floor, beacause there's a gap between the pads and rotors on all four corners.

Not only have you killed your dear old canine friend, you've now thrown a check brake code that you may or may not be able to reset yourself.

Scott
 

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N2, $1,200+ delivered to my door.
 

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Scott, very nice!! I've wondered how the Performance rotors stack up, let us know after they get bedded/broken-in. Also curious about the solid bushings. Its a love/hate thing with some of the more astute tuner folks as to whether they benefit or hinder. Finally, are those still the OEM lines or did you get some nice trick Kevlar ones??
 

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shortyb, thank you, and those are OEM lines. Kind of a contradiction, now that you point it out...

EDawg, TMS claims the solid bushings better align and center the caliper on the pins, thus providing even, aligned pad clamping force. I have no doubt this is true, but one possible downside with the solid bushings is that they will require periodic cleaning and greasing. The OEM rubber ones are sealed off to the elements and are maintainance free, in that respect.

One other thing, I've noticed pad "knock off" on rare occassions. I'm hoping the solid bushings will eliminate that. Time will tell.

Scott
 

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Scott, its all good. Those are still some very nice upgrades and should produce some noticable improvements.

Regarding the caliper bushings, they may or may not help with pad knockback. It is a result of rotor/caliper deflection AND bushing deformation under hard braking dynamics. Having the bushing interface tightened up should keep it in check for the most part, but under some high stress situations it could still happen. Due, again, in part to the large single piston, sliding pin calipers. The floating rotors will reduce the hat/plate deflection phenomenon dramatically as they move and will be "tracked" by the caliper within a certain limit of movement. The bushings will (should) further reduce the twist in the caliper mounting interface that occurs under hard braking. Where the controversy lies is does some movement benefit the overall braking performance, or produce more slopiness? It is believed that the OE bushings were designed this way to allow a small amount of movement to compensate for the inherent slopiness of a sliding pin/large piston caliper. The other side argues that the slopiness IS because of the rubber bushings and that a more solid bushing will eliminate slopiness and firm up the braking feel. Who knows for certain, but some that have used them notice a flatter wear pattern in the pad surface. This would seem to validate the need the tighten the pin/bushing interface. The naysayers also believe that some binding could result due to caliper deflection, lack of lubrication, or dirt/grit build-up. Let us know what you think after putting them through some hard use. Of course, with you, there will NOT be any dirt build-up or lack of lubrication worries :thumbup:.
 

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A few more thoughts...

When retracting the caliper pistons, be sure that your brake resevior doesn't overflow. You may have to suck brake fluid out to make room.
Hate to contradict you, but it is recommended that you open the bleeder as you push the pistons back into the caliper. It keeps the "trash" fluid that is in the calipers from being pushed back into the master cylinder, or worse the ABS control unit. Also, the master cyl. won't overflow. Other than that, great tech advice. And, nice brake setup!!! :thumbsup:
 

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OMG! What is this?!?!?! Do I see water spots on the microfilter cover/housings??? And those mats!!!! Please vacuum the 6 grains of dirt off of them immediately!!! Man, are you ever falling down on the job or what?!?!? :D
 

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SLO, your car is completely immaculate.

You must be an absolute PITA to live with.

And I think I love you.... :rofl:

Nice write up on the brakes, looking forward to hearing your thoughts on them once you've beat on them some.
 

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Turbo, that's damn good advice. I have never done that nor have I ever heard that. Fortunately, I bleed my brakes ever year, during my "annual". Regardless, thanks for mentioning that. It truly is great advice.

Xcel, yeah, my wife's Mercedes is just as pampered, as is the house and the yard. Being retired, I even wash the floors on my hands and knees so I can do a more thorough job. I will tell you this, we have a Chrysler Pacifica (fantastic second row room and comfort) for our family, visitors, dog, home improvement store car; and I have to tell you I drive the crap out of that thing. I finally paid to run it through the car wash yesterday because it hadn't been washed in three months! All I do is change the oil every 5K, the air and cabin filters every 15K, and check the air pressure in the tires when I feel like it. That poor bas&@$! of a vehicle is actually a pretty nice piece, though it's treated like a second class citizen...

shortyb, that floor mat does look pretty un-tidy with the flash and all...

Wife's car picture attached. Nice shine, eh? Yeah, I know, I'm not well!

Scott
 

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Incredible write up/review!! You are meticulous! :) I'm not only happy to hear you are enjoying your brakes, but that I have the good fortune of meeting someone with your kindness soon! Thanks for the good deed of sharing your fortune with others!
-toby.
 

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that car is immaculate:bow:

keep us posted on how the new rotors and pads work out.
 

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question: why did you go with the bmw performance drilleds as opposed to say a set of zimmerman drilleds? any compelling reason, or just cause they are bmw? :hmm: 1200 is pretty steep, i didn't spend even half that when i got my zimmerman drilled fronts and oem rears.
 
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