E46 Fanatics Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Ride of the Month Challenge!

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am posting here as to not crowd the DIY section with a non DIY post. If people post links to DIY's, then maybe this thread should be moved.

I like the DIY on m3.madrussian.net, but all of their DIY's are for an m3. It seems that this translates well to my 325i, but I was wondering about other options. Searching these forums there aren't many. I am hoping that the DIY will also have info for how to use the motiv power bleeder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
The madrussian site is definitely pretty good for some of the DIY's. If you study the DIY for SS Brake lines you will be able to look at your brake lines and know what needs to be done. The brake lines pretty much tell you what to do by when you get your tires off and look at them.

The motive brake bleeder is really easy.
(car on jacks; all 4 tires off)
1) put brake fluid in brake bleeder.

2)screw Motive bleeder hose to brake reservoir.

3) make sure that the pump lid is screwed on tightly (as well as hose to brake reservoir) and pressurize the tank to about 20psi

4) beginning with passenger rear tire, attach a bleeder line/bottle (to capture expelled brake fluid) to caliper bleeder screw. Open bleeder screw and let brake fluid bleed out of caliper until fluid looks clear and is without bubbles.

5)close bleeder screw and detach bleeder line/bottle from nipple of bleeder screw

6) repeat steps 4 and 5 for rest of calipers in following order:

rear passenger (already covered)
rear driver's side
front passenger
front driver's side

7)Note: take a look at the Motive Pressure bleeder every once in a while to make sure that it doesn't go below 15psi while bleeding the calipers.

8) Once satisfied with bleeding process (fluid is clean and without air bubbles) is done, SLOWLY unscrew the top of the pressure bleeder to gently release pressure from the bottle. Also, make sure that the fluid pickup tube inside the pressure bleeder is tilted out of the brake fluid while you are releasing pressure from the system.

9) Once pressure is released from pressure bleeder, unscrew the line from the brake fluid reservoir and replace brake reservoir cap. DONE!:thumbup:

There are also those, like me, who also do another round of bleeding the old school, manual way after using the pressure bleeder just to make sure that all air is out of the system and brake pedal feel is satisfactory.

I think that I covered all the steps, and if not, I am sure that somebody will chime in to correct me.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sounds great... thanks!!

It does seem self explanatory, but I am not mechanically inclined, just good at following directions. I like to see solutions to all the possible things that can go wrong, so I am prepared to deal with them. Should I expect difficult bolts? What to do about the brake fluid coming out after I remove the old lines? etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
578 Posts
Ah yes. Those are good questions indeed.

Yes, there is definitely a good chance that there is going to be some brake fluid messiness as you are taking off the old lines and installing the new ones. Make sure that you have an oil drain pan beneath the brake lines to catch the fluid that falls. Also, it is very important that you don't get any brake fluid on the paint of your car. Brake fluid is esther glycols (I believe):hmm:, which pretty much means that it eats clear coat and automotive paint. There can be a bit of awkwardness as you unscrew the lines from the caliper due to the fact that you don't want to get brake fluid everywhere, but the lines themselves aren't really tricky to loosen or anything like that.

Also, be careful when tightening the bleeder screws. Make sure to not over-tighten. If one breaks it can be a real PITA to rectify.


Also, I found another article that discusses brake bleeding with a power/pressurized bleeder. Hope it helps.:D


http://www.e38.org/brake_bleeding.htm

PS - If you don't have this site bookmarked yet, this is a pretty good one for DIY information. It includes articles from multiple sources, madrussian included, but is generally pretty helpful.

http://www.bimmerdiy.com/dir/e46

and another

http://www.pelicanparts.com/bmw/techarticles/tech_main.htm

Good Luck! Have some fun doing some upgrades on your car!:thumbup:
 

·
Registered
E46 F10 W204 W212
Joined
·
5,171 Posts
The_Don has some very good info. As another user of the Motive Power Bleeder i'll chime in. There are probably many ways to bleed brakes, so i'll just add my variations and random notes.

Use your finger to lubricate the mouth of the reservoir with some fresh brake fluid before connecting the hose. At least on my bleeder, the "gasket" is some kind of hard plastic that won't seal against the reservoir without some reasonable tightening. It easier to tighten that connection when the surface that mates with the connector is lubricated. You don't want that connection leaking because the engine bay is painted, and you can't take it all apart if you did get brake bluid back there. Have a rag around the reservoir just in case.

Overall bleed prrocess is pretty much the same as The_Don's, except I do the "old school, manual way" during the bleed process, while the power bleeder is connected. That is, someone does the pump-pump-hold as I release the pressure at the other end, during which the power bleeder is connected and pressurized. The fluid flows more freely, and at least on my other car it's actually necessary because there's not enough pressure from the bleeder to get the fluid flowing at an acceptable pace.

Maximum recommended by the manufacturer is 18psi. I've bled at 15-18psi, but Don looks like he's safely taken it to 20psi with no problems.

I tilt the pickup away from the fluid before the last wheel. This way the reservoir isn't filled to the brim when it's time to disconnect it. As far as disconnecting the bleeder, depressurize from the tank side first before disconnecting the reservoir. Remember this if you don't want brake fluid on you and your paint.

If you can find it, use a clear hose to connect the catch tank to the bleed nipple. This way you can easily see if the fluid stream is void of bubbles and it's time to move to the next wheel. Makes your bleed session more efficient because you're not guessing if the fluid stream still has bubbles or not. You'll end up using less fluid, too.

I used a torque wrench for the nipples after I was done at each corner and before I put the wheel back. 3.5-5Nm for 7mm nipples, 12-16Nm for 11mm nipples. Its easy to overtighten these.

For everything else I would follow what The_Don has written. Good info. Save for replacing brake lines, a bleed can be done without spilling a drop. I use a 1L can of Super Blue or TYP200 and it's enough, but I'd keep another liter handy if you've never done it before.

Paolo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
Old lines need to be disconnected from hard lines first before disconnecting them from the calipers. Install new lines in reverse order--calipers first then connect to hard lines. I lubricated the threaded parts of the new brake hoses with brake fluid, but not sure if that's really necessary. Try not to led brake fluid reservoir drop below the "Min" level, so that means don't leave the lines disconnected overnight or while you break for lunch. It doesn't spurt out but it does do a steady drip-drip-drip when the lines are off. I think if it takes you start with a full reservoir and have each of the 4 hoses off for 10 minutes, you should be okay, though you will need to add more fluid when bleeding afterward.

Edit: Note how old lines are routed before removing them. I got a little confused on the back and had to go check the other side to be sure of the correct routing. Also the nut connecting the hard line to the hose was not in my standard metric flare nut wrench pack, so I had to use a combo wrench. Maybe it was 11mm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You guys are great... I truly appreciate all the info... now its time to start my 5 hour (supposed to be <1 hour I assume) job. lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,235 Posts
Try your wrenches on the old and new brake lines. On my 03, flare wrenches didn't seem to fit the nuts and I used a thin nosed Viper Grip wrench. (bottom style)

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
I should add you could disconnect old lines from caliper first (before disconnecting from hard lines), if you unbolt the caliper and spin it. Not sure there is any reason to do it that way though.

xi_ter: yes, my metric flare nut wrenches didn't fit, but one of my standard open-ended wrenches did. I think my flare nut wrench set has 8 sizes: 8mm, 10mm, 12mm, 13mm, 14mm, 15mm, 16mm, 17mm, but the nuts were 9mm or 11mm. The problem is if the nuts are stuck due to road salt corrosion, a standard wrench could round them off, so what you suggested would be safer.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top