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i've seen people talking about gettin 5000K and like 8000K lights what exactly are they?........are they supposed to replace ur xenon lights or replace the non-xenon lights??........
i thought xenon lights don't ahve bulbs??.........can someone explain?
 

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...and I'd be all shiny..
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Yea, this is a Xenon measurment generally. Higher you go the more blues and purples you get, lower more white light(or more redish...i dont remember)
 

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David328Ci said:
the operating temperature of the xenon bulb
Incorrect. Xenon (high intensity gas discharge) bulbs' housing temperature reaches a range anywhere from 185 to 842 degrees Fahrenheit during operation, depending on the bulb. The "operating temperature" of the xenon bulb must conform to the operating temperature of the car, so probably it's rated for everything from -50 and below to 110 degrees Fahrenheit. The 4300K, or 5000K, or 8000K indication is the "color temperature" of a light source. This relates to something called "black body radiation", which I won't go into much detail over. But look at it this way - the sun's surface temperature is about 4000-5000 degrees Kelvin, and, given that it radiates energy like a "black body", it will radiate a range of wavelengths shaped kind of like a bell curve that peaks between yellow and green in the visible spectrum. The color temperature rating of a light source expresses its output color range in terms of a hypothetical "sun" with a surface temperature equal to the light source's color temperature rating.

So if a xenon bulb outputs a color temperature of 4300K, you can say that it's very close to sunlight (however, the wavelength distribution of a gas discharge lamp is very different from a "black body" radiation source). Whereas a bulb rated at 8000K would not be close to sunlight at all, it would output light similar to what a star twice as hot as the sun would produce. Because human eyes have evolved to conform to the radiation spectrum emitted by the sun, our peak sensitivity is right about where the sun's peak luminosity is. Therefore, for best visibility, you should use a xenon lamp that has a color temperature between 4000K and 5000K.
 
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