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Your choice in dongles comes down to whether your car supports OBD2/EOBD or not. It's doubtful a 5/2000 build 320D will support EOBD since the EU didn't require EOBD for diesels until 2004.

There are plenty of ELM compatible bluetooth dongles out there (I'm using a Veepeak one) that will do basic OBD2/EOBD stuff, but I can't think of any that'll do the proprietary BMW stuff.
 

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I'm not really sure about the protocol of my car, I think it's ISO 9141, I have used this product, connected via 20pin adapter, but it does not work. (same Bluetooth device worked with Hyundai accent 2001)
View attachment 783877

So I'm a bit confused at the moment with which one to buy, I don't want it to read advanced data since my BWM scanner with PA soft already working fine and can program my car with it.
I just want to connect to my android head unit and read some basic data such as RPM, speed, temps and such.

Thanks
OBD2/EOBD is a government mandated standard for automotive diagnostics. There are a ton of different variations, and like you've discovered, the E46 often uses the ISO 9141 variant. However, EOBD wasn't mandated for diesel passenger vehicles in the EU until 2004. Australia was even further behind requiring ADR 79/01 in 2006 for gasoline powered vehicles and 2007 for diesel ones. The bluetooth dongle you're using with your Hyundai is an OBD2/EOBD dongle. If it supports ISO 9141 and ISO 14230 but does not work with your car it is very likely that your car does not support EOBD.

PA Soft is using a proprietary BMW protocol that looks like ISO 9141 or ISO 14230 depending on which control unit it's communicating with. To the best of my knowledge there are no ready-to-go bluetooth dongles that support these proprietary protocols. If your car doesn't support EOBD, you're basically SOL. If there was an EOBD compliant version of your engine/DDE combo you could potentially reflash the DDE but you'd want to make sure that no additional emissions equipment would be required.

Earlier OBD2 compliant cars with the 20 pin connector under the hood only wired up the DME to the OBD2 port, but left the other control units accessible only via the 20 pin connector. If you can communicate with PA Soft via the OBD2/EOBD port, this wiring isn't the issue.

1: Some ECUs like MS45.x and ME7.2 use an ISO 14230-like protocol for proprietary communications and may implement OBD2/EOBD in the style of ISO 14230 and not 9141.
 
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