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Old 01-16-2020, 12:23 PM   #1
Chrisbish2000
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Brake flexi stuck in caliper

Im currently replacing the rear brake lines on my coupe so i'm doing the flexi pipes aswell. Of course the hard line nut was rusted into the flexi (Wish it came off as easy as It does in those YouTube videos) I ended up just cutting the hard line off still in the flexi as I'm replacing both anyway. As some may know the rear brake flexi pipe also screws into the caliper and needs to be removed to be replaced.

My flexi is stuck in the caliper on both rears and it will not screw out. I've tried penetrant and heat but it can't get in there very well, convinced it's glued in. Anyone had this problem? Im not really looking for advice lol I just want to tell someone haha. I've been looking up new calipers all day as I've been here for 6 hours trying to remove it and had enough.

I was looking forward to doing the job in one day but every single job I do I spend 90% of it trying to remove something that's stuck.
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Old 01-16-2020, 01:04 PM   #2
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I have got them off other BMWs by cutting the rubber hose at the fitting and using a socket. PB Blaster is your friend.
Try Rockauto for rebuilt calipers at good prices.
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Old 01-16-2020, 01:19 PM   #3
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Is the nut rounded or intact? That will affect your approach. And yes, PB Blaster is the best. Brush off as much rust as you can before you apply the penetrant, and always make sure you use flare nut wrenches.
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Old 01-16-2020, 01:51 PM   #4
Chrisbish2000
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Is the nut rounded or intact? That will affect your approach. And yes, PB Blaster is the best. Brush off as much rust as you can before you apply the penetrant, and always make sure you use flare nut wrenches.
Oh the hard line nut was rust welded into the flexi. Hence why I'm replacing the flexi. I cut the metal brake line above the nut and put a 6 point socket over it which should be better than a flare wrench but no, would not move and rounded with the force and crumbling rust. I've been putting penetrant on it for a week leading up to this. I burned it with fire also. Nothing. They have become one lol.

I might try cutting the flexi and using the socket. That's an idea thanks.
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Old 01-17-2020, 03:28 PM   #5
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I have got them off other BMWs by cutting the rubber hose at the fitting and using a socket. PB Blaster is your friend.
Try Rockauto for rebuilt calipers at good prices.
PB Blaster or Liquid Wrench though? That's the age old question.

Most say PB but there's allot of online test videos say that say LW is just as good if not better. This always starts a fight lol.

Last edited by Chrisbish2000; 01-17-2020 at 03:29 PM.
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Old 01-17-2020, 07:38 PM   #6
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Both are vastly overhyped, IMO.
Anytime I've ever sprayed penetrant, the bolt comes out dry.
That tells me the penetrant never soaked into anything.
Can you use heat? That is the undisputed champion.
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Old 01-18-2020, 12:12 AM   #7
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Both are vastly overhyped, IMO.
Anytime I've ever sprayed penetrant, the bolt comes out dry.
That tells me the penetrant never soaked into anything.
Can you use heat? That is the undisputed champion.
Well some penetrant is better than none. I watched a video on a test to see if they make a difference and they do.

Heat isn't really an option. Where the flexi screws into the calliper it's surrounded by well....the calliper, very thick there but once the calliper is out it may be easier.

Amazing how a brake line job turns into removing the entire caliper assembly. I would have been done in 1-2 hours if everything came off as it should.
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Old 01-18-2020, 08:08 AM   #8
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PB Blaster or Liquid Wrench though? That's the age old question.

Most say PB but there's allot of online test videos say that say LW is just as good if not better. This always starts a fight lol.
I'll put my dukes up

Kroil is the best. Kano Labs. Industrial strength (literally). The stuff you can get in the parts stores is crap.

Just sayin'



As far as your issue, sounds like you need to punt and just get new calipers.

Last edited by Efthreeoh; 01-18-2020 at 08:10 AM.
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Old 01-18-2020, 08:15 AM   #9
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Not sure where you're at exactly, but maybe if you bolt the caliper back onto the car, you'll have two hands to remove the fitting.

I have fought many times going backwards in auto work, but sometimes it's the best thing. If you f up the hex part, try a plumber's wrench.
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Old 01-18-2020, 08:18 AM   #10
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I'd just like to add. This comes from years of experience. If you are a serious DIY'er, and plan on working on you cars for a lifetime, I recommend setting yourself up with an air compressor and air tools. Yes, recent electric stuff is okay, but compressed air has a far wider birth of tools for almost every need.

In chrisbish's situation, cutting the hose off the fitting and using a deep well socket and a butterfly impact wrench would have removed the fitting from the caliper without any fuss.
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Old 01-18-2020, 09:03 AM   #11
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I'd just like to add. This comes from years of experience. If you are a serious DIY'er, and plan on working on you cars for a lifetime, I recommend setting yourself up with an air compressor and air tools. Yes, recent electric stuff is okay, but compressed air has a far wider birth of tools for almost every need.

In chrisbish's situation, cutting the hose off the fitting and using a deep well socket and a butterfly impact wrench would have removed the fitting from the caliper without any fuss.
I have a Milwaukee impact wrench (electric) with a deep well socket but I'm hesitant to use it on this.
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Old 01-18-2020, 09:40 AM   #12
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I have a Milwaukee impact wrench (electric) with a deep well socket but I'm hesitant to use it on this.
Well, I think I read where the flats are now rounded (?). If not, an impact wrench is ideal because that is the purpose of the impact function, to incrementally put short, high-load torque on the fastener. If you can hammer a smaller (read SAE sized socket) on the fitting, try that with the impact wrench. What size is the fitting 10MM? 12MM?

What size is the Milwaukee wrench, 1/4-drive, or 3/8-drive?
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Old 01-18-2020, 10:19 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrisbish2000 View Post
I have a Milwaukee impact wrench (electric) with a deep well socket but I'm hesitant to use it on this.
Well, I think I read where the flats are now rounded (?). If not, an impact wrench is ideal because that is the purpose of the impact function, to incrementally put short, high-load torque on the fastener. If you can hammer a smaller (read SAE sized socket) on the fitting, try that with the impact wrench. What size is the fitting 10MM? 12MM?

What size is the Milwaukee wrench, 1/4-drive, or 3/8-drive?
The hard line nut into the flexi pipe is an 11mm but thats not the issue anymore as that just crumbled away. I've cut the hard line and ordered a new flexi but the issue now is where the flexi screws Into the caliper. It's a 16mm fitting (I think) on the rear of the caliper.

The impact gun is a 1/2 inch. I'll try it but I have visions of it just rounding it, I'm probably over thinking. I just don't want to buy an unnecessary new caliper. I need some proper penetrant first, then I'll try it.
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Old 01-18-2020, 01:34 PM   #14
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I'd pull the caliper and put it on the bench and apply heat ruthlessly until the fastener glows red. Don't make the surrounding caliper that hot - focus on the brake line caliper. Heat works better than any penetrating oil. I also agree Kroil is the very best and all the rest are behind it. So, pull the caliper. You'll benefit from being able to clean up parking brake levers and lubing the caliper pins, etc as well - definitely in order if you live where salt has taken this much toll on the rest of the caliper/lines.
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Old 01-18-2020, 01:42 PM   #15
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In a vise, heat it really good, hammer around it a few good whacks then use vice grips to at least crack it loose, then slowly work it back and forth until it comes out.
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Old 01-18-2020, 02:34 PM   #16
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I've rebuilt my parking break assembly already, taken it all apart, cleaned lubed and replaced the spring hardware.

The caliper is off now and on the bench. I'll get the impact on it. Wish me luck.

Last edited by Chrisbish2000; 01-18-2020 at 02:35 PM.
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Old 01-18-2020, 06:30 PM   #17
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Honestly, don't do that. Heat is your friend. If you don't have a torch, you can get one with a tank for like $25 and they're worth it in gold if you live in an area that has rust. The brake hardware is soft metal so it will distort slightly and seal well. So you may find you'll break it VERY easily on the bench. Heat.
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Old 01-18-2020, 06:45 PM   #18
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In situations like this - where the nut is rounded off/deformed - I resort to heat and a six inch pipe wrench.
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Old 01-18-2020, 10:03 PM   #19
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People know I'm talking about this right?
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Old 01-20-2020, 03:19 PM   #20
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Ok so I used my Milwaukee Stubby 1/2" impact on it and it just took care of everything with no fuss, everything came out perfectly. I was hesitant to use one at first as I've destroyed small stuff like this with the bigger impacts but after swinging on the application for ages with heat and a socket wrench I thought F it.

What a tool though! I don't use it much but the Stubby is perfect for all around general stuff, perfect torque settings, handled it nicely. I should have just tried it from the start instead of wasting hours worrying about it. You live and learn.

I used the impact on the other side and it was all done in 5 minutes. If I had used just a flare wrench then it would not have come off, luckily I was able to cut the hard line and get a socket on as I was replacing the lines. I always try it by hand first and they were not budging. New flexi and new hard lines have been ran and all looking like new.

I wanted to see if it could get the first hardline nut off which I rounded just to see if it would go, I whacked a 9mm socket onto it, hit the impact and off it came. Crisis averted lol.

Highly recommend this impact wrench. I've been testing it all day and can't believe how versatile it is. Very underrated gun and will be used allot more now.
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